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Archives - State Agencies - Department of Health - Vital Records

STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Division of Vital Records
[Authorized: NDCC Chapter 23-01]

Legislation created the Territorial Board of Health (T. L. 1885, Ch. 63). Following statehood, the State Board of Health became responsible for documentation of vital statistics and the North Dakota Legislative Assembly passed an act to provide for the collection of vital statistics. The health office of each city and the superintendent of the county board of health obtained and registered births and deaths in the county. The birth records included name, the date of birth, the place of birth, parents, and date of the records. The registry of deaths included the date of death, name of deceased, sex, color, and the condition whether single, widowed, or married. Also included was the age, and place of birth, the names and place of birth of the parents, the disease or cause of death, and the date when the information was recorded. The county auditor from every county furnished each health officer with a record book to register the facts concerning births and deaths. The superintendent of the county board of health was to keep the records for the county judge. Parents gave notice to the health officer of births and deaths of their children as did every household. If they could not do so the oldest person in the household or a next of kin was to notify the health officer. Public and charitable institutions also gave notice of deaths and births. The county superintendent of the county board of health transmitted the information to the Superintendent of the State Board of Health. Birth and deaths were reported before the tenth of each month. The Superintendent of the State Board of Health issued and delivered certificates to the county health officer (S.L. 1893, Ch. 133). Legislation in the same year allowed for the creation of city boards of health and expanded the duties of county boards of health to include enforcement of North Dakota health laws. The State Board of Health was re-organized in 1899 (S. L. 1899, Ch. 30) and consisted of the Attorney General as president and two other members appointed by the Governor. One was required to be a physician and to serve as the Superintendent of Public Health.

The Health Statistics Act of 1907 required that births and deaths be registered and preserved, burials and cemeteries be regulated, and marriage certificates, abstracts of divorce, annulment of marriage decrees, and abortions be filed and copies to be maintained (S. L. 1907, Ch. 270). Another re-organization in 1923 (S. L. 1923, Ch. 227) created a State Department of Health governed by the Public Health Advisory Council. One division of the State Department of Health provided for in the statute was Vital Statistics. The functions and responsibilities of the State Department of Health have continued substantially with broad responsibility to provide services to maintain public health through the divisions.

Legislation in 1975 brought about changes with the Health Statistics Act to include specific information for birth and death registration along with a section for specific situations concerning births and deaths, marriage registration, reporting of divorce, annulment of marriage, and administering permits for burial (S.L. 1975, Ch. 223). The Office of Statistical Services [NDCC 23-02.1-02] was established within the State Department of Health to install, maintain, and operate a system of health statistics tabulation and analysis and system of vital records registration throughout the State. The system of vital records registration included the registration, collection, preservation, amendments, and certification of birth, death, fetal death, marriage, divorce, or other records determined as necessary by the State Health Officer or a designee [NDCC 23-02.1-01].

Legislation in 1993 added the Vital Records Division as a part of administrative services within the State Department of Health and the division had responsibility for registering and preserving birth and death records and maintaining marriage certificates, abstracts of divorces, abortion legislation, and marriage annulment decrees. The State Registrar and local registrars were authorized to supervise and regulate and protect access to vital records and accessibility to certain birth records (S.L. 1993, Ch. 249).

In 2001 the State Registrar implemented an automatic system allowing a local registrar to produce copies of death certificates locally within two working days of filing with the State (S.L. 2001, Ch 232). Later legislation repealed sections relating to registration districts and local registrars (S.L. 2007, Ch. 234).

Vital Records remains within State Department of Health administrative services and has responsibility to register and preserve birth and death records and to file and maintain copies of marriage certificates, abstracts of divorces, abortion, and annulment of marriage decrees.

BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND BURIAL REGISTRATIONS
Legislation in 1903 addressed vital statistics by amending and re-enacting sections from the1899 Political Code regarding the collecting and reporting of vital statistics. The city, township, county officers, the county commissioner, and the superintendent of the county board of health were charged with the task of obtaining and registering facts concerning the births, deaths, and contagious and infectious diseases. A certified copy of the registry was sent to the State Superintendent of Health and once a week for four consecutive weeks during the month of January the records were published in at least one official paper within the county under the heading of ''Vital Statistics" (S.L. 1903, Ch. 205). In 1907 the State Bureau of Vital Statistics was established (S.L. 1907, Ch. 270). All births and deaths throughout the State were registered with a certificate of birth or death. A certificate was then issued by the State using the US Bureau of Census and the American Public Health Association standard form. Complete and proper registration of births and deaths were necessary for legal, sanitary, or statistical purposes. The Bureau of Vital Statistics was established under the immediate authority of the Superintendent of the State Board of Health and the secretary of the Board had general supervision of the Bureau. The Bureau of Vital Statistics Act provided for registration of births, deaths, regulation of burials, duties of undertakers, cemetery sextons, and special situations of births and deaths. The registration of births and deaths contained very specific reporting information. For the purpose of this act the secretary served as ex-officio State Registrar of Vital Statistics. The State Registrar had responsibility to make, promulgate, and enforce necessary laws and regulations to carry out the provisions of the act. Accommodations were provided for the Bureau of Vital Statistics at the State Capitol in Bismarck (S.L. 1907, Ch. 270). The State was divided into registration districts. Each incorporated village and city and each township constituted a registration district. The clerk of the township, village, or city was the local registrar for the district. A deputy registrar was appointed to serve in the absence of a clerk. The State Registrar would appoint a local registrar for an unorganized township and with the approval of the State Registrar, the local registrar appointed a sub-registrar. The clerk as local registrar would forward all signed certificates to the registrar of the township within ten days of the birth or death and in all cases by the third of the following month. The certificate was sent to the county superintendent of health and the information transmitted to State Superintendent of Health. Physicians, midwives, and undertakers were required to be registered by the State Registrar and were required to furnish a certificate of death within five days to the health officer who forwarded it to the county superintendent of health. It was then sent to the State Superintendent of Health. (S.L. 1907, Ch. 270). Additionally, in 1907 the Legislative Assembly amended section 4587 of the 1905 Revised Codes relating to cemetery corporations with the plats housed within the office of the register of deeds (S. L. 1907, Ch. 44).

Legislation in 1913 amended the qualifications for an embalmer (S.L. 1913, Ch. 158). In 1923 legislation provided guidelines for reporting deaths of an indigent person, suicides, or violent deaths (S.L. 1923, Ch. 227). Another act provided definitions and regulations for maternity hospitals (S.L. 1923, Ch.164). The licensee of the hospital reported to the administration all births and the content of the record was not to be disclosed except in judicial proceedings or to officers of the law or other legally constituted boards and agencies (S.L. 1923, Ch. 164).

Changes were made to sections 544 and 546 of the 1913 Compiled Laws relating to the practice and profession of embalming or preparing human bodies for burial or shipment (S.L. 1931, Ch. 141). Legislation required that all records of State Registrar of Vital Statistics and of local registrars relating to births be kept confidential. Information obtained from the records could be furnished to any State department upon the order of the Attorney General. In 1941 an act specified the duties for clerks at the district courts and of the county court with increased jurisdiction to send information on births to the State Registrar of Vital Statistics (S.L. 1941, Ch. 296). Chapter 109 of the 1939 session laws was repealed and legislation created an act providing for proof of birth, the correction of birth records, and the issuance by the State Registrar of Vital Statistics. All records of State Registrar of Vital Statistics and of local registrars were considered confidential and a penalty was provided when local registrars disclosed confidential information (S.L. 1941, Ch. 297). In 1943 (S.L. 1943, Ch. 271) the law required that all certificates, applications, affidavits, and other records be on file with the State Registrar of Vital Statistics. Births remained confidential and not open to inspection with the exceptions of the adult whose birth had been earlier recorded, or by legal parents or a general guardian, or the Veterans Service Commission, or the Department of Veterans (S.L. 1943, Ch. 271). Also, in 1943 there were changes in the areas that comprised a registration district (S.L. 1943, Ch. 273). Each county of the State constituted a primary registration district for registration of births, deaths, and other vital records. The clerk of district court for each county was appointed as the local registrar. Legislation authorized the State Registrar of Vital Statistics to issue death certificates in certain cases including deceased veterans (S. L. 1945, Ch. 194). Embalmers, undertakers, and coffin sellers were required to keep records and report information to the State Registrar of Vital Statistics, and every person, firm, or corporation selling a casket was required to keep a permanent record open to inspection by the State Registrar (S. L. 1945, Ch. 196). Additionally, several amendments to the 1943 Revised Code related to the registration of stillborn children (S. L. 1945, Ch. 197) and certificates were issued on forms recommended by the Division of Vital Statistics, US Bureau of the Census (S.L.1945, Ch. 198).

Legislation in 1965 changed [NDCC 23-02-09] relating to the duties of local registrars (S.L. 1965, Ch. 188) and the destruction of welfare records and availability of State records by the Division of Vital Statistics (S.L. 1965, Ch. 189).

Ten years later the Office of Statistical Services was established within the State Department of Health by the creation of the Health Statistics Act. A part of the Health Statistics Act related to birth registration concerning parentage, relationship of father and mother, and the surname of the baby on the birth certificate (S.L. 1975, Ch. 311). Each county constituted a registration district for the purpose of enforcing the Health Statistics Act. The clerk of each district court in North Dakota was designated the local registrar who appointed as needed one or more deputies for local registrar for each registration districts.

In 1993 information indicating cause of death remain a closed record except to a relative or personal representative of the deceased, to the attorney or agent of relatives, or person representing the deceased (S.L. 1993, Ch. 249). Added to the list of who could obtain information on child fatalities was the Child Fatality Panel. Information was given to the panel to protect the health and welfare of children and identify the cause of child deaths (S.L. 1995, Ch. 135). Additionally, legislation relating to the Health Statistics Act provided for an act to amend and re-enact many sections of the Century Code relating to corrections and amendments of vital records as adopted by the State Department of Health to protect the integrity and accuracy of the records. The State Department of Health regulated the conditions under which additions or minor corrections were made to birth records within one year after the date of a birth as in the case of amending records of paternity (S.L. 2015, Ch.188).

MARRIAGE LAWS, DOMESTIC RELATIONS, HUMAN RIGHTS
Legislation in 1871 concerned married women in cases of desertion and allowed a wife make contracts for her own labor, the labor of her minor children, and use her own name to sue for and recover her wages and the wages of her children (T.L. 1871, Ch. 32). Laws referring to marriage in 1887 protected the legal rights and personal identity of a married woman and she retained the right to the same legal existence and legal personality after marriage as before (T.L. 1887, Ch. 98). A license for marriage was required by 1890 and marriage was described as a personal relationship arising out of a civil contract. The age to qualify for marriage was fourteen for a female and sixteen for a male. Persons of this age needed a signed consent from parents or guardians, however, females eighteen and males twenty-one could marry without consent. One could not marry a relative. Marriage licenses were granted under oath by the judge of county court of several counties. The license consisted of two sections the marriage license and a marriage certificate prepared after the ceremony. The judge of county court kept a marriage record book and a copy of all marriage licenses and certificates. Laws also included details about a marriage license and certificate, the custody of marriage registers, and who could solemnize a ceremony (S.L. 1890, Ch. 91). Marriage could be solemnized by judges within their own jurisdiction, justices of the peace within their respective jurisdictions, ordained ministers of the gospel, and priests of every church throughout the State. The Society of Friends or Quakers were also qualified (S.L. 1890, Ch. 91). By 1907 two witnesses were added to the marriage ceremony to sign the certificate in addition to the signature of the person who solemnized the marriage (S. L. 1907, Ch. 172) and in 1917 the requirement for applying for a marriage license meant that the county judge was to receive with the marriage application an affidavit under oath when a decree of divorce had been granted to either or both parties (S.L. 1917, Ch. 153). Legislation in 1925 required that all marriages be registered with the State Registrar of Vital Statistics (S.L. 1925, Ch. 162). The judge of county court recorded the issued marriage license and the certificate from the person performing the ceremony. The license and certificate were then transmitted to the State Registrar of Vital Statistics. When the State Registrar had properly recorded the license and certificate, they were returned to the county judge (S.L. 1925, Ch. 162). A registration fee was charged. In 1931 the fee was kept with the State Treasurer and passed into the general fund (S.L. 1931, Ch. 180). Additionally, no person could solemnize a marriage without receiving a license from the parties (S.L. 1931, Ch. 179). The county judge issued certified copies of the certificates and the justice indexed all marriage licenses (S.L. 1931, Ch. 130).

Legislation in 1975 was related to the amendment and re-enactment of [NDCC 14-03-01] and [NDCC 14-03-02] regarding the contract of marriage and the lawful age for marriage (S.L. 1975, Ch. 126). The 1975 Health Statistics Act required a record to be filed with the State Registrar for marriages performed in the State. The officer who issued the marriage license prepared the certificate prescribed and furnished by the State Registrar from the information obtained from the applicants. Every person performing a marriage ceremony certified the facts of marriage and filed the record with the officer who issued the license. The officer issuing the marriage license completed and forwarded it to the State Registrar on or before the fifth day of the month (S.L. 1976, Ch. 223).

By 1989 the Legislature increased the marriage fee with a portion added to a fund for domestic abuse (S.L. 1989, Ch. 176). During the 1990s legislation concerning domestic relations required several interim studies including one in 1993-1994 by the interim Court Services Committee and another in 1997-1998 by the Child Support Committee. In 1999-2000 the Judiciary Committee recommended a bill to consolidate into one chapter laws dealing with divorce and separation, to re-enact the penalty for intentionally removing a child from the State in violation of a child custody order, to apply the best interest standard to the annulment process, and to make language changes in the domestic relations statutes. The bill was enacted by the Legislative Assembly (S.L. 2001, Ch. 149). The 2005 legislation (S.L. 2005, Ch. 132) provided for an increase in the marriage license fee. The Legislative Council studied during the 2005-2006 interim State marriage laws. Findings and recommendations were reported along with legislation required to implement the recommendations to the Sixtieth Legislative Assembly. Also considered was House Bill No. 1420 (2005) requiring a six-month waiting period for a divorce during which the parties would be required to attend a seminar on the effect of divorce on children. The bill failed to pass the House. Additionally, a Legislative Management study was required during the 2013-2014 interim. Laws concerning the marriage contract [NDCC 14-03] defined marriage requirements and provided for the Uniform Pre-marital Agreement Act.

SEPARATION, DIVORCE, AND ANNULMENT
The Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Dakota created thirty-one sections of legislation relating to divorce along with definitions, circumstances, validity, and concerns regarding children, property, and residency. It also included the rights of a wife involving real estate and the determination of the courts concerning the care, custody, and maintenance of any minor child (T.L. 1864, Ch. 18). An early law in 1899 regarding divorce stated that a divorce would not be granted unless the plaintiff had, in good faith, been a resident of the State for twelve months and a citizen of the US preceding the beginning of the divorce action. The court in some cases made an allowance for the wife’s support during her lifetime. Maintenance for children was ordered by the court. On occasion the orders were modified by the court (S.L. 1899, Ch. 75). Also, legislation in 1899 listed the causes for divorce as adultery, extreme cruelty, willful neglect or desertion, habitual intemperance, conviction of a felony, or incurable insanity. Child welfare began early as laws on divorce were passed by the Legislature (S.L. 1899, Ch. 75). In 1901 incurable insanity was removed. However, the courts gave habitual intemperance, if continued, one year before a divorce was granted (S.L. 1901, Ch. 71). Section 4048 of the Revised Codes of 1905 was amended and provided for the dissolution of marriage, the effect of the dissolution, and the duty of the court to regulate the re-marriage of either or both parties (S. L. 1911, Ch. 183). Legislation acted to amend and re-enact sections 4071, 4073, and 4074 of the 1905 Revised Codes by involving either party in alimony support, or maintenance of the children. This included the settlement of separate homestead properties held by the wife or husband (S. L. 1911, Ch. 184). Additionally, legislation gave the court the authority to require the defendant to provide for the temporary support and maintenance of the plaintiff (S. L. 1911, Ch. 185). A diagnosis of insanity for a period of five years was added to the cause for divorce and the examination of the types of insanity addressed (S.L. 1915, Ch. 121). The State residency requirements changed over time (S.L. 1915, Ch. 122) and a plaintiff who planned on becoming a US citizen could proceed with the divorce. Also, Native Americans who qualified for a divorce were required to file the complaint with Reservation Superintendent (S.L. 1915, Ch. 122).

Legislation passed an act granting a decree of separation from bed and board in 1927. There were specific grounds on which a decree could be granted including a provision for the maintenance of spouse or children and for division of joint and separate property. The decree of separation from bed and board could be from either party and for any of the following causes: cruelty, failure of either party to cohabit, and failure of either party to provide suitable maintenance. A decree of separation from bed and board conferred upon both the husband and wife all the rights of property and contracts as if unmarried and released both husband and wife from all obligations of maintenance. The court would award sums for counsel fees and temporary maintenance while the action was pending. Upon decreeing a separation, the court would order and decree suitable support and maintenance of the wife or husband or children. Jointly owned property was divided. The decree of separation was filed in district court and at any time could be revoked by the same court in which it was pronounced. A separation decree would be relocated for ten to twenty days to remove the separation papers and grant a decree of divorce (S.L. 1927, Ch. 132). A divorce was denied if it showed connivance, collusion, condemnation, limitation or lapse of time. The Legislature amended and re-enacted the decree of separation forever legislation and finalized division of the property or direct payment of alimony. Reference for maintenance of minor children was ordered by the court (S.L. 1933, Ch. 105).

The 1943 requirements added to legislation that the plaintiff must be a citizen of North Dakota, the US, Philippine Islands, or Puerto Rico (S.L. 1943, Ch. 217). An annulment of marriage was granted by the court after it was filed with the clerk of court and sent to the State Registrar of Vital Statistics. Information was provided to the State Registrar by the parties or their legal representative. All court reports of divorces and annulments of a marriage were filed by the clerk of court and forwarded to the State Registrar of Vital Statistics (S.L. 1943, Ch. 117).

Legislation in 1971 added incompatible differences to a cause for divorce (S.L. 1971, Ch. 149) and in 1979 it repealed an act changing the definition of “head of the household” (S.L. 1979, Ch. 195). Legislation also addressed abortion, abuse, custody, and financial support. Three obsolete requirements concerning plaintiff residency were eliminated and a twelve month residency of the State and a US citizen were required (1981, Ch. 165) until 1985 when a residency was reduced to six-months preceding entry of the divorce decree (S.L. 1985, Ch. 191) and legislation concerning division of property in a divorce or separation was also passed (S.L. 1985, Ch. 192). Residency for the plaintiff in a divorce was changed to six months prior to the commencement of the divorce decree (S.L. 1991, Ch. 147).

As of 2001 the causes for divorce were adultery, extreme cruelty, willful desertion, willful neglect, abuse of alcohol and controlled substances, conviction of a felony, and irreconcilable differences (S.L. 2001, Ch. 149). A section of Century Code relating to property and debt division in a divorce case, along with immunity for guardians, court appointed guardians, and child custody was amended in 2001 (S.L. 2001, Ch. 150). Debt division laws were passed (S.L. 2007, Ch. 145). In 2015 new laws concerned termination of spousal support upon re-marriage. A Legislative Management study concerning spousal support ordered by district courts provided for statutory guidance in awarding spousal support (S.L. 2015, Ch. 124). Additionally, the division of property and debts and valuation of property was again addressed (S.L. 2015, Ch. 115). Legislation created [NDCC 14-05] relating to the confidentiality of property and debt listing information on the parties in a divorce (S.L. 2017, Ch.115). Also, in 2017 laws were amended relating to valuation of specific property and the authority of the courts to determine the value (S.L. 2017, Ch. 114). The Century Code [NDCC 14-05] addressed the issues relating to divorce and [NDCC14-07] and to the rights and liabilities of the husband and wife.

CHRONOLOGY
1862    Legislation created an act legalizing marriage in the Territory (T.L. 1862, Ch. 58) and established that marriage was a civil contract and that a license could be obtained from a county clerk. The law also required consent of parties capable of entering into contracts. The valid age requirement for male was sixteen and a female fourteen years of age. Not valid was the intermarriage of white persons with persons of color or intermarriage of a relative by blood nearer than second cousins. The duties of the clerk of the Board of County Commissioners and conditions of how to solemnize marriages were also listed (T.L. 1862, Ch. 59).

1864    The Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Dakota created thirty-one sections of legislation relating to divorce including definitions, circumstances, validity, concerns relating to children, property, and residency. It also included the rights of a wife involving real estate. The courts determined who would care, have custody, and maintenance of minor children (T.L. 1864, Ch. 18). Also, the Legislative Assembly of the Territory authorized married women to convey real estate by power of attorney (T.L. 1864, Ch. 27).

1867    Legislation further addressed the issues of divorce and alimony (T.L. 1867, Ch. 16).

1870    Additional reasons for divorce were again addressed (T.L. 1870, Ch. 16).

1871    Legislation relating to married women stated that any married woman deserted by her husband could make contracts for her own labor, the labor of her minor children, and use her own name to sue for and recover her wages and the wages of the children (T.L. 1871, Ch. 32).

1881    Legislation amended section sixty of the Civil Code as it related to divorce (T.L. 1881, Ch. 57).

1883    The husband or wife were granted power to control and sell real property in cases of financial burden or debt (T.L. 1883, Ch. 68).

1885    Legislation created the Territorial Board of Health (T. L. 1885, Ch. 63).

1887    The Legislative Assembly acted to declare and protect the legal and personal identity of married women (T. L. 1887, Ch. 98).

1890    Laws included penalties relating to marriage, details about the marriage license and certificate, custody of marriage registers, and those qualified to solemnize a ceremony (S.L. 1890, Ch. 91).

1891    Legislation related to marriage licenses and an amendment changing the age of marriage to eighteen for males and sixteen for females (S.L. 1891, Ch. 91).

1893    The county auditor appointed the health officer of vital statistics to collect statistics for births and deaths (S.L. 1893, Ch. 133).

1895    Legislation concerned the preservation of coroner records by amending sections of the Compiled Laws of Dakota relating to counties and county officers and the duties of the clerk of court and treasurer (S.L. 1895, Ch. 37).

1897    Legislation defined and amended the Revised Codes of North Dakota concerning adultery (S.L. 1897, Ch. 2).

1899    The State Board of Health was re-organized in 1899 (S. L. 1899, Ch. 30) and consisted of the Attorney General as president and two other members appointed by the Governor, one of whom was required to be a physician to serve as the Superintendent of Public Health. Early laws relating to divorce and separation required the applicant to be a resident of the State and citizen of the US or with the intention of becoming a citizen (S.L. 1899, Ch. 75). Legislation also included dates of when the law became effective (S.L. 1899, Ch. 76), the causes for divorce (S.L. 1899, Ch. 77), and financial support for wife and children (S.L. 1899, Ch. 78).

1901    The effect of a judgment decreeing a divorce established that parties be restored to the state of unmarried persons. It added that neither party could marry within three months after the time the decree was granted (S.L. 1901, Ch. 70). A list of causes for divorcement were included (S.L. 1901, Ch. 71). Legislation also related to the transfer of cemetery lots by religious corporations and the governance of civil code (S.L. 1901, Ch. 50).

1903    Legislation addressed vital statistics by amending and re-enacting sections from the 1899 Political Code regarding the collecting and reporting of vital statistics and the duties of city, township, and county officers, the county commissioner, and the superintendent of the county board of health. Officers were charged with the task of obtaining and registering facts concerning the births, deaths, and contagious and infectious diseases. Records were kept in the office of the county judge. When a physician was not employed by the county, parents were responsible to give notice of births and deaths to the proper official. A certified copy of the registry of births, deaths, and infectious or contagious diseases was sent to the State Superintendent of Health. Legislation also defined the duties of county auditors including a provision of a record book for each officer to register the public health facts to be sent to the State, also to provide the proper form at county expense, and to publish once a week for four consecutive weeks during the month of January in at least one official county newspaper (S.L. 1903, Ch. 205).

1905    Legislation established a State Board of Embalmers with the officers appointed by the Governor (S. L. 1905, Ch. 111).

1907    The Legislative Assembly created the Bureau of Vital Statistics at the request of the US Census Bureau for the purpose of immediate registration of all births and deaths throughout the State. The use of standardized forms as recommended by the US Bureau of Census and the American Public Health Association was a part of the process and certificates of births, deaths, and burial or removal permits were provided to districts by the State Registrar of the State Bureau. A list of duties was given to the local registrars and sub-registrars (S. L. 1907, Ch. 270). Marriages could be conducted by all judges of courts of record, by justices of the peace, by ordained ministers of the gospel, and priests of every church. Additionally, the forms used for marriages solemnized by the Society of Friends or Quakers were considered valid. Two witnesses to the marriage ceremony signed the certificate in addition to the signature of the person who solemnized the marriage (S. L. 1907, Ch. 172). The Legislative Assembly of the State of North Dakota amended section 4587 of the 1905 Revised Codes relating to cemetery corporations with the plats housed within the office of the register of deeds (S. L. 1907, Ch. 44).

1911    Section 4048 of the Revised Codes of 1905 was amended and provided for the dissolution of marriage, the effect of the dissolution, and the duty of the court to regulate the re-marriage of either or both parties (S. L. 1911, Ch. 183). Legislation acted to amend and re-enact sections 4071, 4073, and 4074 of the 1905 Revised Codes involving either party and relating to alimony, support, and maintenance of the children from a marriage. This included the settlement of separate homestead properties held by the wife or husband (S. L. 1911, Ch. 184). Legislation gave the court the authority to require the defendant to provide for the temporary support and maintenance of the plaintiff in a divorce action (S. L. 1911, Ch. 185). An act to amend section 4037 of the 1905 Revised Codes concerned issuing a marriage license (S. L. 1911, Ch. 186).

1913    Legislation amended section one of Chapter 108 of the 1909 Session Laws relating to the qualifications for embalmers (S.L. 1913, Ch. 158). Regulating marriages and the issuance of marriage licenses, prohibiting marriages in certain cases, and providing penalties for the violation of the provisions were included in this act (S.L. 1913, Ch. 207).

1915    Residency requirements were established for the plaintiff in a divorce (S.L. 1915, Ch. 122) and legislation amended section 4380 of the 1913 Compiled Laws of North Dakota by adding insanity to the list of causes for divorce (S.L. 1915, Ch. 121). Additionally, amendments were made relating to separate and mutual rights and liabilities of the husband and wife as found in section 4414 of the 1913 Compiled Laws (S.L. 1915, Ch. 171). An act for regulating and keeping records was requested of maternity hospitals, boarding houses for children, and also keeping records of businesses placing children, fixing liability for the care of children, or providing for their removal, and prohibiting the sending a pregnant women to other counties where children become public dependents. The judge of district court was given a correct copy of the record (S.L. 1915, Ch. 183). The Legislative Assembly considered it unlawful to separate a child under the age of six months from the mother for the purpose of placing the child in a foster home or institution, or to assist or participate in this separation, or to place, receive, or retain any child in a foster home or institution without the written consent of the mother (S.L. 1915, Ch. 77).

1917    Concerning the regulation of applying for a marriage license the county judge of each county in this State received an affidavit under oath stating that if a decree of divorce had been granted to either or both of parties the county judge would receive a certified copy of the decree/decrees of divorce and file it with the application (S.L. 1917, Ch. 153).

1921    Legislation would not allow the request for a divorce unless the court had proof of the facts alleged by means of a statement, admission, or testimony of the parties, or upon any statement or finding of fact made by a referee. All divorce actions were filed in the office of the county clerk of court and placed by the clerk on the court calendar (S.L. 1921, Ch. 57).

1923    Regulations concerned the birth registration of a child (S.L. 1923, Ch. 164) and keeping birth information confidential (S.L. 1923, Ch. 165). Legislation addressed changes to the Code for the State Department of Health and the division Vital Statistics (S. L. 1923, Ch. 227).

1925    All marriages were registered with the State Registrar of Vital Statistics and returned to the county judge for filing (S.L. 1925, Ch. 162). Upon the issuing and recording a marriage license and with the certificate of the person performing the marriage ceremony the judge of the county court transmitted the license and certificate to the State Registrar of Vital Statistics where a record book of all marriage licenses and certificates was kept. The original license and certificate were returned to the county judge who indexed all records (S.L. 1925, Ch. 162).

1927    An act providing for separation from bed and board specified the cause upon which a divorce decree was granted. It also related to separation of property of husband and wife (S.L. 1927, Ch. 132).

1929    Legislation amended a section from the 1913 Compiled Laws of North Dakota relating to marriages and marriage licenses stating that marriages could be solemnized by all judges of courts of record or by justices of the peace within their respective jurisdictions, or by ordained ministers of the gospel, or priests of every church. Also considered as valid were marriages solemnized by the Society of Friends or Quakers. A license and certificate were issued to the parties under the guidelines prescribed by law and signed by two witnesses to the marriage ceremony (S.L. 1929, Ch. 160).

1931    Amended was legislation relating to marriages by adding that the ceremony could be solemnized by a minister of the gospel licensed by regular church bodies or denominations (S.L.1931, Ch. 179). When a marriage license was returned to the county, the judge indexed the record and issued a certified copy of the license and certificate. A fee of one dollar was the charge (S.L. 1931, Ch. 180). Legislation repealed the American Indian marriage contracts under section 4365 of the 1913 Revised Code of North Dakota (S.L. 1931, Ch. 181). An act regulated cemetery and provided for the appointment of sextons, secretaries, and for plotting cemeteries (S.L. 1931, Ch. 104). Changes were made to sections 544 and 546 of the 1913 Compiled Laws relating to the practice and profession of embalming or preparing human bodies for burial or shipment (S.L. 1931, Ch. 141).

1933    Legislation amended and re-enacted section 5 of Chapter 132 from the 1927 Session Laws relating to the decree of separation forever legislation making the final division of the property or direct the payment of alimony and establish the orders with reference to minor children (S.L. 1933, Ch. 105). Legislation changed the forms relating to marriage licenses and certificates of marriage (S.L. 1933, Ch. 149).

1937    An act to amend and re-enact section 4400 of the 1913 Supplement to the Compiled Laws concerned to the affirmative proof required in divorce actions (S. L. 1937, Ch. 128).

1939    Any person with syphilis was prohibited from marrying and the results of a serology test for syphilis had to be submitted to county judge prior to the issuance of a marriage license (S.L. 1939, Ch. 162).

1941    Legislation related to furnishing information of paternity to the State Registrar of Vital Statistics. Legislation also included the duties of the clerks of the district court and of the county court with increased jurisdiction (S.L. 1941, Ch. 296). Additionally, it related to the duties of the State Registrar concerning proof of birth, the correction of birth records, and the issuance of certification by the State Registrar. Other legislation related to vital statistic records of illegitimate children and required a new marriage certificate by parents or by adoption. (S.L. 1941, Ch. 109).

1943    The plaintiff in a divorce proceeding was required to be a resident for twelve months in North Dakota and a citizen of the US, Philippine Islands, or Puerto Rico. Also added to the legislation were American Indians (S.L. 1943, Ch. 217). Laws relating to confidentiality of birth records were amended (S.L. 1943, Ch. 271) including an act by which any citizen could request the date of birth and place of birth (S.L. 1943, Ch. 272). Legislation related to sections 436 and 437 of the 1913 Compiled Laws and addressed registration districts for the purpose of registering vital statistics, designating the registrar, and prescribing the duties of the local registrar by defining their powers (S.L. 1943, Ch. 273).

1945    Legislation (S. L. 1945, Ch. 194) authorized the State Registrar of Vital Statistics to issue death certificates in certain cases including deceased veterans by issuing and filing death certificates upon request or under the provision [23-02] of the 1943 Revised Code. Embalmers, undertakers, and coffin-sellers were required to keep records and report information to the State Registrar of Vital Statistics. Every person, firm, or corporation selling a casket was required to keep a permanent record open to inspection by the State Registrar (S. L. 1945, Ch. 196).  Several amendments to the 1943 Revised Code [23-02] related to the registration of stillborn children (S. L. 1945, Ch. 197) and the use of forms recommended by the US Bureau of the Census, Division of Vital Statistics (S.L.1945, Ch. 198).

1947    The Public Health Advisory Council was superseded by the State Health Council with an expanded membership. Duties were essentially the same as the Public Health Advisory Council.  As a part of the duties the State Health Officer chose directors of the divisions including vital records. The 1943 Revised Code was amended and re-enacted as it related to the duty of counties to bury deceased persons (S. L. 1947, Ch. 198). At the request of State Health Planning Committee and through the Public Welfare Board legislation, a report of births out of wedlock and births with congenital deformities was sent to the division of child welfare of the Public Welfare Board (S. L. 1947, Ch. 315). Legislation required the division of child welfare of the Public Welfare Board to define, license, and supervise maternity homes for unmarried mothers. It repealed sections [50-1301 to 50-1313] of the 1943 Revised Code (S.L. 1947, Ch. 316). Every birth in a maternity home for unmarried mothers was attended by a legally qualified physician or a registered nurse who attended the birth and directed delivery services. Subsection 7 of section [14- 0503] of the 1943 Revised Code related to grounds of insanity or the otherwise institutionalized in cases of divorce (S. L. 1947, Ch. 138). Also, a list of diseases, illnesses, and conditions of insanity was addressed (S.L. 1947, Ch. 138). Legislation also amended 1943 Revised Code section [14-0716] concerning the abandonment or non-support of a wife (S. L. 1947, Ch. 139).

1949    Legislation required the State Department of Health to request a blood test from pregnant women for syphilis and required that certificates of birth be issued for every baby including stillborn (S.L. 1949, Ch. 190). Legislation also amended and re-enacted subsection 5 of [23-0603] of the 1947 Code Supplement relating to the duty of counties to bury the deceased  (S.L. 1949, Ch. 188) along with other legislation relating to the duties and exceptions as carried out by the person charged with the burial (S.L. 1949, Ch. 189).

1951    Changes were made to legislation concerning marriage license applications (S.L. 1951, Ch. 120). A statewide uniform law was set up regarding the recognition of divorce decrees and marriage annulments (S.L. 1951, Ch. 121) and reciprocity agreements from other states for enforcement of maintenance regarding financial support (S.L. 1951, Ch. 122). Legislation also related to adoption petitions (S.L. 1951, Ch. 123) and addressed the duty of counties to bury deceased persons (S.L. 1951, Ch. 173).

1953    Changes were made to fees charged by the State Registrar of Vital Statistics (S.L. 1953, Ch. 172) and to payments made under pre-arranged funeral plans (S.L. 1953, Ch. 174).  Legislation revised [NDCC 50-02-01] relating to changes in the definition of a residence for married women who received State relief (S.L. 1953, Ch. 288).

1955    The State Health Department was required to transfer the funds from unclaimed fees into the State general fund (S. L. 1955, Ch. 81). The 1943 Code [NDCC14-03-04, 14-03-05, 14-03-26 and 14-03-27] addressed miscegenation and was repealed by the Legislative Assembly (S.L. 1955, Ch. 126). Additionally, payments of assistance for unmarried mothers or to the dependent children of unmarried mothers changed (S.L. 1955, Ch. 300). Other legislation concerned divorce and reciprocal enforcement of financial support (S.L. 1955, Ch. 127).    The 1943 Code was amended [NDCC 23-06-03 and NDCC 50-07-34] concerning burial costs in county welfare cases (S.L. 1955, Ch. 299).

1957    Century Code revisions concerned the marriage of minors who were age eighteen to twenty-one and consent of parents or guardians. Additionally, legislation provided the divorced parties with a certified copy of the decree (S.L. 1957, Ch. 117). Legislation also addressed when a marriage could be conducted (S.L. 1957, Ch. 118).

1959    Changes to the design of marriage licenses and certificates were made and the original returned to the county judge with a duplicate sent to the married couple (S.L. 1959, Ch. 137).   Extensive legislation addressed the disinterment and removal of bodies in cemeteries (S.L. 1959, Ch. 216).

1961    Enforcement of cemetery regulations included furnishing reports and submitting plans to the State Department of Health (S.L. 1961, Ch. 198).

1963    Applying for a marriage license changed for members of the armed forces who were stationed North Dakota (S.L. 1963, Ch. 126), and legislation denied a divorce on the grounds of connivance, collusion, condonation, or limitation and lapse of time (S.L. 1963, Ch. 127). Amendments to the Code concerned the operation of cemeteries in the State and funding for the perpetual care and maintenance of cemeteries and the sale of burial space (S.L. 1963, Ch. 209).

1965    Legislation changed [NDCC 23-02-09] relating to the duties of local registrars (S.L. 1965, Ch. 188) and [NDCC 23-02-23] regarding the destruction of welfare records and availability of State records (S.L. 1965, Ch. 189). Legislation to solemnize a marriage ceremony by the Spiritual Assembly of Baha’i faith was added (S.L. 1965, Ch. 112) and fees collected by counties for a serology test were deposited with the State Treasurer (S.L. 1965, Ch. 113). Additions to the causes for divorce included adultery, extreme cruelty, willful desertion, willful neglect, habitual intemperance, conviction of a felony, and the length of time determined by the diagnosis of insanity (S.L. 1965, Ch. 114). Habitual intemperance no longer had the one-year provision (S.L. 1965, Ch. 114). The Code [NDCC 23-06-01] was changed relating to the right to dispose of one's own body and to provide and regulate the manner of disposition (S.L. 1965, Ch. 190 ), funds for the perpetual care, and maintenance and the sale of burial space (S.L. 1965, Ch. 208), and providing for the upkeep of abandoned cemeteries in certain counties (S.L. 1965, Ch. 191).

1969    Additional legislation concerned [NDCC 14-13-17] regarding the application for a marriage license (S.L. 1969, Ch. 150). The payment of burial costs for burying a deceased person was part of this legislation (S.L. 1969, Ch. 253). Additionally, an amendment and the re-enactment concerning the authority when ascertaining the cause of death by the next of kin (S.L. 1969, Ch. 254) and legislation allowing for “all or part of a human body after death” as a gift (S.L. 1969, Ch. 255).
1971    Legislation provided an act for a standard serology test for syphilis for couples applying for a marriage license (S.L. 1971, Ch. 146) and amended and re-enacted [NDCC 14-03-17] when a marriage license application required a signature from a physician (S.L. 1971, Ch. 147). The transfer of marriage records to the Bureau of Vital Statistics was requested by amending and re-enacting [NDCC 14-03-22] of the Century Code (S.L. 1971, Ch. 148). Changes were also made to the fees collected by the State Registrar for birth and death certificates (S.L. 1971, Ch. 257). Irreconcilable differences were added as a cause of divorce (S.L. 1971, Ch. 149). Additionally, changes to [NDCC 23-02-35] concerned the investigation and certification process in the occurrence of a death without medical attendance, the role of the undertaker, local health officer, and local coroner (S.L. 1971, Ch. 258).

1973    Changes related to who may solemnize a marriage ceremony (S.L. 1973, Ch. 121) and re-marriage. Also child support legislation amended and re-enacted several sections of [NDCC 14-03-17] making it mandatory for the county judge to file a copy of the application for marriage license prior to divorce action where the applicant must provide child support or alimony combined with child support (S.L. 1973, Ch. 122). A separation decree could be relocated for ten to twenty days to remove the separation papers and a grant for a decree of divorce (S.L. 1973, Ch. 123). [NDCC 14-03-19] related to licenses issued to those in compliance with the law. If a recorder had approval from the Board of County Commissioners, and was satisfied that there were no legal impediments to the marriage, and the applicants complied, the recorder would issue and sign the marriage license in duplicate and affix an official seal on the original and the duplicate copies. Legislation related to bonding of each person charged with the responsibility of setting aside and depositing funds in a perpetual care fund and to the licensing of perpetual care cemeteries (S.L. 1973, Ch. 217).

1975    The Office of Statistical Services was established within the State Department of Health during the creation of the Health Statistics Act. It provided responsibility relative to health statistics and registration of vital events such as births, deaths, marriages, divorces, annulments, and other vital records as determined necessary by the State Health Officer. The State Health Officer appointed the director and served as ex officio State Registrar of Vital Statistics (S.L. 1975, Ch. 223). Bills related to domestic relations included the amendment and re-enactment of [NDCC 14-03-01] and [NDCC14-03-02] relating to the contract of marriage and the lawful age for marriage (S.L. 1975, Ch. 126).

1977    Persons aged eighteen or a female age sixteen needed the consent by parents and guardians for a certificate of marriage (S.L. 1977, Ch. 133). Individuals with communicable syphilis were prohibited from applying for a marriage certificate and [NDCC 14-03-12] required a serology test before a marriage application could be filed (S.L. 1977, Ch. 134). Other legislation concerned new reporting procedures, requirements, certification, and fees concerning coroner's services (S. L. 1977, Ch. 104) and the duty of the responsible party for a burial (S. L. 1977, Ch. 220). The Legislature authorized [NDCC 23-06-30] a mill levy for counties to maintain abandoned cemeteries (S. L. 1977, Ch. 221).

1979    Legislation made changes to the Code relating to information filed on birth registrations (S.L. 1979, Ch. 311) and over the issuance of new birth certificates after the adoption of foreign-born persons [NDCC 23-02.1-18]. It amended and re-enacted [NDCC 14-15-18] and [NDCC 23-02.1-17] relating to reports on adoption and the application for a new birth certificate after the adoption of one foreign-born (S.L. 1979, Ch. 202). Legislation also amended the role of the Social Services Board concerning the deceased having no survivors (S.L. 1979, Ch. 312). Additionally, it repealed an act changing the definition of “head of the household” (S.L. 1979, Ch. 195) and addressed legislation on abortion, abuse, custody, and financial support.

1981    Three divorce law requirements became obsolete [NDCC 14-05-17] as did the status of one year of residency (S.L. 1981, Ch. 165). The Vital Records Division became a part of administrative services within the State Department of Health and had responsibility for registering and preserving birth and death records and maintaining marriage certificates, abstracts of divorces, abortion legislation, and marriage annulment decrees. After copies were filed [NDCC 14-03-21] the original marriage certificate was kept by the county judge. Changes were also made to [NDCC 23-02.1-29] relating to the preparation and collection of fees for certified copies of local death certificates (S.L. 1981, Ch. 280). Other legislation related to indigent burial responsibilities (S.L. 1981, Ch. 281) and abandoned cemetery registration requirements (S.L. 1981, Ch. 282).

1983    A pre-marital serology test for syphilis [NDCC 14-03-12] was required before the application for a marriage license could be completed and legislation also defined a standard serology test [NDCC 14-03-13]. The State Laboratories Department reported serology testing content and legislation also addressed when testing was unnecessary [NDCC 14-03-14]. This law was repealed in1983 (S.L. 1983, Ch. 175, § 3). Changes were made to [NDCC 14-03-17] regarding marriage license applications (S.L. 1983, Ch. 174) and the Code was changed [NDCC 23 - 02.1- 29] relating to fees for certification and correction of birth and death certificates (S.L. 1983, Ch. 288). Additional legislation addressed pre-need burial contracts (S.L. 1983, Ch. 289) and information relating to the date of burial (S.L. 1983, Ch. 290). It also related to the unlawful opening of burials (S.L. 1983, Ch. 291) and the identification and maintenance of abandoned cemeteries. (S.L. 1983, Ch. 292). The human rights act included a State policy against discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, the presence of any mental or physical disability, or status with respect to marriage or public assistance (S.L. 1983, Ch. 173).

1985    Legislation amended [NDCC 14-05-17] and [NDCC 14-06-06] concerning the residency requirements in a divorce proceeding and changed separation to six months (S.L. 1985, Ch. 191). Laws related to the enforcement in the division of property in a divorce or separation (S.L. 1985, Ch. 192).

1989    The Legislature increased the marriage fee with a portion of it added into a fund for domestic abuse (S.L. 1989, Ch. 176). Legislation also addressed the custody of children when domestic violence was involved (S. L. 1989, Ch. 178).

1991    Legislation related to [NDCC 14-03-10] and [NDCC 14-03-19] concerning the issuance of a marriage license (S. L. 1991, Ch. 145) with new language added to [NDCC 14 - 03-17] to the marriage application (S. L. 1991, Ch. 146). Changes were also made to [NDCC 14-05-17] and [NDCC 14-06-06] relating to residency requirements for the granting of divorce and separation decrees (S. L. 1991, Ch. 147). Other domestic relations legislation concerned changes to the requirement of informed consent for abortions and civil damages for performance of abortions without informed consent (S. L. 1991, Ch. 141). Additionally, legislation addressed employment discrimination, child custody decisions, records relating to adoptions, and changes to laws concerning domestic violence. [NDCC 23-01-13] was repealed concerning the submission of blood samples required of a pregnant woman for the serology test for syphilis (S.L. 1991, Ch. 263, § 1).

1993    An amendment to the Code related to child custody determinations (S.L. 1993, Ch. 144) and concerned domestic relation cases. A study was requested to take place during the interim relating to child custody cases (S.L. 1993, Ch. 145).    Domestic relations legislation also addressed child custody and support, domestic violence, adoption of an adult, petitions for adoption, and information identifying adopted persons and their genetic parents and siblings. Other legislation related to the authority of clerks of district court to solemnize marriages (S.L. 1993, Ch. 142) and to surnames on marriage licenses and certificates (S.L. 1993, Ch. 143). A created section of Century Code was concerned with the enforcement of court orders arising out of decrees of divorce and decrees of separation from bed and board and enforcement within the means of the law (S.L. 1993, Ch. 146). The Code [NDCC14-03-07] was repealed as it related to prohibiting marriages of severely retarded institutionalized persons (S.L. 1993, Ch. 141).

1995    Legislation provided access to a child's death record at the request of the Child Fatality Review Panel (S.L. 1995, Ch. 116) and the Legislature allowed the Health Council to permit use of newborn metabolic disease screening tests for research purposes (S. L. 1995, Ch. 245).

1997    A new section in the Century Code addressed domestic violence in custody proceedings. It amended sections concerning visitation rights and child custody proceedings related to the birth of a child born during divorce or annulment. Additionally, death certificates were required to include the social security number of the deceased (S.L. 1997, Ch. 404).

1999    Legislation repealed various laws including [NDCC 50-20] on the reporting of out-of-wedlock births and births of children with visible congenital deformities (S.L. 1999, Ch. 422, § 2).

2001    Laws were amended to delay registration of a death (S.L. 2001, Ch. 48). Several repeals included [NDCC 23-06-03.1] regarding the deposit of payments on pre-need funeral contracts (S.L. 2001, Ch. 368, § 7) and [NDCC 14-06] concerning separation from bed and board (S.L. 2001, Ch. 149, § 13). Legislation in 2001 allowed for a hyphen or space in combinations of surnames on the license application (S.L. 2001, Ch. 185).

2005    Fees for a marriage license increased and a Legislative Council Study on marriage laws was tasked to consider a study of marriage laws and methods for strengthening the institution of marriage, including pre-marital requirements, such as marital education and counseling, waiting periods, and marital blood tests. This included the study of the availability of marriage counseling and parenting education, and the implementation of pre-divorce requirements and the effects of divorce. The Legislative Council reported findings and recommendations to the Sixtieth Legislative Assembly (S.L. 2005, Ch.132).

2007    Legislation at the request of the State Department of Health concerned creating and enacting a new section to [NDCC 23-02.1] relating to filing electronically records of birth, marriage, fetal death, and death records. Limited access was granted for birth and death information to the Department of Human Services. Birth certificate copies were issued to the individual whose name was on the record if the individual was at least sixteen years of age, parents named on the record, an authorized representative, or by court jurisdiction. Death certificates were issued to a relative or an authorized representative. Beginning January 1, 2008, the Division of Vital Statistics required all birth, marriage, death, and fetal death records [NDCC 23-02.1-02.1] to be filed and registered electronically using the Department of Health electronic registration system. Additionally, marriage records were returned to the county. Duties of local registrars were repealed by legislation as were the duties of the sub-registrar (S.L. 2007, Ch. 234).

2009    Legislation concerned surnames on a marriage application. However, after solemnizing the marriage that name had to be consistent on the marriage license (S.L. 2009, Ch. 146).

2011    Legislation related to [NDCC 23-02.1-27] the confidentiality of birth, death, and fetal death records, filings, data, or other information related to birth, death, and fetal death records. The State Registrar was required to restrict access to all vital records and to protect vital records from loss, mutilation, or destruction and to prevent disclosure of the information contained in the records except as authorized by law (S.L. 2011, Ch. 185). Licensed physicians could access death record for the purpose of researching family medical history (S.L. 2011, Ch. 185).

2013    An act created and enacted [NDCC 14-03.2] the Uniform Pre-marital and Marital Agreements Act and the abrogation of common law regarding pre-marital and marital agreements. Legislation was repealed [NDCC 14-03.1 and [NDCC 30.1-05-07] relating to the Uniform Pre-marital Agreement Act and the waiver of the right to elect a surviving spouse. Other repeals included [NDCC 14-03.1] concerning the Uniform Pre-marital Agreement Act (S.L. 2013, Ch. 121, § 2).     Amendments were made to titles of those officiating at marriage ceremonies (S.L. 2013, Ch.120). Additionally [NDCC 14-07-08] relating to the liabilities of a husband and wife was amended and re-enacted (S.L. 2013, Ch.122).    Changes were made to the definition of marriage (S.L. 2013, Ch. 121).

2015    Legislation relating to the Health Statistics Act as introduced by the Human Services Committee at the request of the State Department of Health provided for an act to amend and re-enact numerous sections of the Century Code regarding the registration of birth and death. Changes were made to vital statistics [NDCC 23-02.1-25], and to the correction and amendment of vital records as adopted by the State Department of Health to protect the integrity and accuracy of vital records. Also, there were changes to the role of the State Registrar in the amending of paternity records (S.L. 2015, Ch.188) and [NDCC 14-05-24.1] relating to spousal support termination (S.L. 2015, Ch.124). A new section was created and enacted to [NDCC 14-05] concerning the confidentiality of property and debt listing information (S. L. 2017, Ch. 115). The Century Code was amended and re-enacted a [NDCC 23-01-05.5] relating to providing notification on the report of death to the next of kin or an authorized representative of the deceased (S. L. 2017, Ch. 185). Middle name options on a marriage license application or license were amended (S.L. 2015, Ch.124). Confidential records could be requested by a hospital, physician, medical professional, medical facility, mental health professional, or health facility. Additionally, all records of death from domestic violence were reported to the Domestic Violence Fatality Review Commission (S.L. 2015, Ch. 125).

2017    Legislation changed [NDCC 14-05-24] concerning the division of property and debts in a divorce by allowing the court to make an equitable distribution of the property and debts of the parties except under federal law for specific property. The power of the court determined a just and equitable valuation date (S.L. 2017, Ch.114). Legislation created a new section [NDCC 14-05] relating to the confidentiality of property and debt listing information of the parties in a divorce (S.L. 2017, Ch.115).

2019    Legislation concerned domestic relations including abortion (S.L. 2019, Ch. 125,126), child abuse (S.L. 2019, Ch. 130) and financial support S.L. 2019, Ch. 127, 128). Also, familial duty (S.L. 2019, Ch. 129) and grandparent rights (S.L. 2019, Ch. 131). Health and safety legislation included end of life (S.L. 2019, Ch. 209) and death and burial responsibilities (S.L. 2019, Ch. 207).

SOURCES
Gray, David P. Guide to North Dakota State Archives, 1983.
Judiciary Committee. [Memorandum 79024]. (2005, September). North Dakota Legislative Council.
Laws of Dakota Territory.
North Dakota Century Code.
North Dakota Department of Health, Division of Vital Records Website
North Dakota State Legislature Session Laws.

SERIES
32213 Health Department. Division of Vital Records, Divorce Records.
32214 Health Department. Division of Vital Records, Marriage Records.

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