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STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF NORTH DAKOTA
[Authorized: NDCC Chapter 55-01]

A State Historical Commission and authorization for a state historical society were established in 1895. In 1905, the Legislative Assembly provided an appropriation and facilities in the Capitol and named the Society trustee for the state. The Society remained a quasi-public institution until 1965, when legislative action created the State Historical Board as the governing body of the agency. In 1967, the private membership organization was severed from official connection with the state agency.  ln 1987, the Legislative Assembly authorized the State Historical Society of North Dakota to create a new membership adjunct without voice in governance of the agency.

The society is under the supervision of the 12-member State Historical Board.  Seven members of the board are appointed by the Governor for three-year terms. The remaining members are ex officio: the Commissioner of Commerce, Director of the Department of Transportation, Secretary of State, Director of Parks and Recreation Department, and State Treasurer. From among the appointed members, the Board elects a president, vice president, and secretary. The board appoints the Director of the State Historical Society of North Dakota to administer the agency and carry out policies and directives. The agency is organized into six divisions:

Administration is headed by the Assistant Director and is responsible for overall agency support, budgeting and fiscal matters, personnel management, and security.

The Archaeology and Historic Preservation Division protects and manages cultural resources by identifying and recording sites related to North Dakota's prehistory; surveying, identifying and recording structures and sites eligible for listing on the North Dakota Historic Sites Registry; and nominating structures and sites for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.  The Director of the State Historical Society of North Dakota serves as the state historic preservation officer.  The Director of the Archaeology and Historic Preservation Division is Deputy Historic Preservation Officer. The Division preserves and manages 57 state-owned historic sites ranging in size from nearly 200 acres (Fort Clark State Historic Site) to markers occupying less than a tenth of an acre.

The Museum Division collects and manages artifact collections representative of North Dakota history and culture; designs and mounts interpretive exhibits at the North Dakota Heritage Center and ten branch museums, and oversees a traveling exhibit program. The museum (and agency) is fully accredited by the American Association of Museums. 

The Communications and Education Division: produces public and educational programs and events for adults and children at the North Dakota Heritage Center and other locations; provides liaison services to North Dakota's 140 county and local historical societies;  produces publications including a quarterly journal, North Dakota History, and a quarterly newsletter, Plains Talk;  coordinates visitor services for the Heritage Center.

Historic sites: preserves and manages 57 state-owned historic sites representative of North Dakota history and culture.  These sites range in size from nearly 200 acres (Fort Clark State Historic Site) to markers occupying less than one-tenth acre. 

The State Archives Division collects, manages and references documentary resources relating to state history and culture.  The Division is the official state archives, preserving North Dakota government records of enduring value. Its extensive collections also include the state’s official newspapers, books, photographs, maps, manuscript collections and audiovisual materials. The Director of the Division serves as North Dakota State Archivist.

State Historical Society of North Dakota activities are headquartered in the North Dakota Heritage Center on the Capitol grounds.

HISTORICAL SOCIETY,  STATE (STATE HISTORICAL BOARD)

Prior to creation in 1905, the State Historical Society of North Dakota was preceded by a number of small exclusive historical/social groups. Interest in documenting and preserving the history of what is now North Dakota dates back to the time of the establishment of Dakota Territory. An act incorporating "The Old Settlers Historical Association" was approved by the territorial Legislative Assembly in 1862 (Private Laws 1862, Ch. 4). Membership of the Old Settlers Historical Association was limited to people who resided in the territory prior to passage of the enabling act creating Dakota Territory. The purpose of the Association was "to provide a fund for the support and assistance of such of the old settlers of Dakota who may be deemed worthy of support; and, also, to collect and disseminate all useful information in relation to the early history and settlement of Dakota..."

The Old Settlers Historical Association was soon replaced by the Historical Society of Dakota, authorized by an act of the Legislative Assembly in 1863 (Private Laws 1863, Ch. 65). The Historical Society of Dakota was charged with collection of historical materials relating to the history of the territory, maintenance of a library, and rescuing "from oblivion the memory of its early pioneers." The collections of the Old Settlers Historical Association were transferred to custody of the Historical Society of Dakota.

In 1889, "The Ladies Historical Society" was established with a membership limited to women residing in Bismarck prior to construction of the Northern Pacific Railway to Bismarck in 1873. Dropping part of their exclusiveness, the Ladies Historical Society changed its name to the "Ladies Historical Society of Bismarck and North Dakota" in 1894 and extended membership to women living in the northern part of Dakota Territory prior to statehood. Men who resided in the northern part of Dakota Territory prior to statehood were permitted to join as honorary members. Adopting a statewide emphasis, the historical society reorganized again late in 1894 and was renamed the North Dakota Historical Society.

The North Dakota Historical Society was given quasi-public status in 1895 when the State Legislature created an Historical Commission consisting of the Governor; State Auditor; Secretary of State; Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor; the president of the North Dakota Historical Society; and William H. Moorhead, an early pioneer (S. L. 1895, Ch. 70). The duties of the Historical Commission were to collect and preserve artifacts and library materials relating to the early history of the state. The State Legislature was to provide a room in the State Capitol for the collections of the Historical Commission. Receiving little public support, the North Dakota Historical Society stagnated.

The Historical Commission was revitalized by legislation in 1903 that allowed the Commission to accept contributions of historic sites and artifacts, and provided an appropriation of $1,000. At the same time, efforts were in progress to reactivate the North Dakota Historical Society. The membership of the North Dakota Historical Society voted to changed their name to the State Historical Society of North Dakota. Orin G. Libby, a history professor at the University of North Dakota, was designated as Secretary for the State Historical Society of North Dakota. Libby is credited with reviving the historical society and played a key role in the development of the agency for the next 30-40 years.

In 1905, the Historical Commission was discontinued and authority for governing the State Historical Society of North Dakota was formally vested in a Board of Directors consisting of the Governor, Secretary of State, State Auditor, Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor, Superintendent of Public Instruction, and five members elected by the membership (S. L. 1905, Ch. 25). The State Historical Society was made a trustee of the state and was authorized to accept collections on behalf of the state and prohibited from disposing of property without legislative approval. The staff, facilities, and programs of the State Historical Society of North Dakota grew slowly over the next 30 years. The agency acquired a large number of historic sites and state parks and moved the museum and library from the Capitol to the Liberty Memorial Building in 1925. The first edition of Collections appeared in 1906, and the State Historical Society of North Dakota began publishing the North Dakota Historical Quarterly under the editorship of Orin G. Libby in 1926.

To manage the construction and development of the growing number of state parks during the 1930s, the State Legislature empowered the Board of Directors to establish a State Parks Committee in 1935 (S. L. 1935, Ch. 216). During the 1930s and 1940s, federal agencies including the National Park Service and the Works Progress Administration developed many state parks and historic sites and initiated various research and writing projects under the auspices of the State Historical Society of North Dakota.

The mid 1960s were a period of transition for the State Historical Society of North Dakota. In 1963, the State Legislature restructured the Board of Directors making the Governor, State Auditor, Secretary of State, Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor, and the State Game and Fish Commissioner ex-officio members (S.L. 1963, Ch. 368). The remaining nine members were appointed by the Governor (rather than elected by the membership) for staggered three-year terms. The Board of Directors were replaced by the State Historical Board in 1965 (S. L. 1965, Ch. 379), consisting of the Secretary of State, State Engineer, State Highway Commissioner, Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor, State Forester, State Game and Fish Commissioner, State Librarian, State Treasurer, and nine members appointed by the Governor with consent of the Senate. The Commissioner of Agriculture was removed from the State Historical Board in 1967. The State Historical Board has full control of the State Historical Society and appoints the Superintendent to head the agency. The Superintendent is a member of the Yellowstone-Missouri-Ft. Union Commission (1959); Theodore Roosevelt Rough Rider Awards Committee (1963); and the Outdoor Recreation Interagency Council (1977)

The North Dakota Park Service was created in 1965 (S. L. 1965, Ch. 37), thus removing many of the state parks managed by the State Historical Society and placing them under the jurisdiction of the new parks agency. Most historic sites remained under supervision of the State Historical Society. The membership of the State Historical Society of North Dakota reorganized in 1966 and formed a new private organization, the North Dakota Historical Society, Inc.

The late 1960s and 1970s were a period of growth and achievement for the State Historical Society of North Dakota. Creation of the North Dakota Heritage Commission in 1965 (S. L. 1965, Ch. 381) and the subsequent construction of the North Dakota Heritage Center, growth in staff and funding, and authorization of state archives legislation characterize the transition. The State Historical Society now has responsibility for preservation and interpretation of historical materials, sites, and artifacts; publishes North Dakota History and a quarterly newsletter, Plains Talk; maintains a museum in the North Dakota Heritage Center illustrating the history of the state; provides archival services to state and local governments and the public; maintains a reference collection consisting of published and unpublished manuscripts and archival material, books, microfilm, newspapers, maps, photographs, posters, and published state and federal government documents; inventories, excavates, and evaluates archaeological sites and preserves North Dakota's archaeological resources; reviews and provides assistance for historic preservation projects in the state; and aids in the formation and growth of local historical societies in the state.

CHRONOLOGY

1862       The Old Settlers Historical Association was charged with the task of providing a fund to support and assist the old settlers of Dakota (Public Law 1862, Ch. 4).

1863       Dakota Territory was opened for homesteading and the Historical Society of Dakota was created (Public Law 1863, Ch. 65).  

1864       Custody of the Territorial Library was transferred to the Historical Society of Dakota and the first newspaper to be published in northern Dakota, The Frontier Scout, was issued at Fort Union.

1866       Legislation from 1863 was amended by incorporating the Historical Society of Dakota. Meetings were held the first Tuesday in January and officers included a President, two Vice-Presidents, a Secretary, Treasurer, and Librarian. The remaining officers were determined by the Society and twelve members represented a quorum (T. L. 1866, Ch. 5).

1872       Fort Seward (Fort Cross) in Stutsman County and Camp Hancock (Camp Greeley) were established as military posts.  Camp Hancock (Burleigh County) later served as a US Weather Bureau station from 1874 to1940 and then as a US Soil Conservation Service until 1949.

1883       The territorial capital was moved from Yankton to Bismarck and the first capitol was constructed. 

1889       North Dakota was admitted to the Union as the 39th state and a State Constitution was adopted.  The first State Legislature convened at Bismarck in November. Also in 1889 the Ladies Historical Society was established.

1893       The Selkirk Burial Site at Pembina (Fort Daer) in Pembina County was established in 1812 as an agricultural colony near Pembina by settlers from Canada under the authority of a royal grant to Lord Selkirk. The site had been authorized as a historic site under the care of the State of North Dakota in particular the Governor, Secretary of State, and the State Auditor (S. L. 1893, Ch. 15).  

1894       The Ladies Historical Society changed its name to the Ladies Historical Society of Bismarck and North Dakota and extended membership to women who had been living in the northern part of Dakota Territory prior to statehood. Men who also resided in the northern part of Dakota Territory prior to statehood were permitted to join as honorary members. Adopting a statewide emphasis the Society reorganized again late in 1894 and became known as the North Dakota Historical Society. The publisher of the Bismarck Tribune Colonel Clement A. Lounsberry served as the first president of the Society.

1895       The Historical Commission was created and members included the Governor, Secretary of State, the Commissioner of Agriculture, the president of the North Dakota Historical Society, and early pioneer William H Moorhead (S. L. 1895, Ch. 70).  Society president Clement Lounsberry also published The Record which served as a semi-official history publication that promoted the mission of the Society.  The Society did receive a promise of a legislative appropriation and rooms in the Capitol.  

1903       The North Dakota Historical Society became the State Historical Society of North Dakota and the Historical Commission was reactivated by the Legislative Assembly.  Orin G. Libby was named the Secretary of the Society.   Legislation did provide an appropriation “for the contribution, purchase, and custody of the sites and relics” and legislation also addressed the powers of the State Historical Commission. Additionally the legislature appropriated funds for the purchase of two historic sites.  Legislation required the Society to purchase land embracing the site of old Fort Abercrombie (Richland County).  Funds were also appropriated for the Walhalla mission grounds (Pembina County) and land embracing the site.  Legislation allowed the first historic sites to be placed in the custody of the Old Settlers’ Associations if the proper care and preservation were made by the Association (S. L. 1903, Ch. 15). The Legislative Assembly was also concerned with the care of county records and that officers having charge of public records be required to keep records in the courthouse at the direction of the county commissioners. County officers included the auditor, treasurer, clerk of court, judge, sheriff, county superintendent of schools, and any other official having charge of public records (S. L. 1903, Ch. 77).

1904       The State Historical Society acquired Whitestone Hill Battlefield State Historic Site (Dickey County).

1905       The Historical Commission was replaced by a Board of Directors and the Governor, State Auditor, Secretary of State, the Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor, and the Superintendent of Public Instruction served as ex-officio members of the Board (S. L. 1905, Ch. 25).  The Legislative Assembly established the Society as “a trustee of the state” and also requested that the Society publish a biennial report (S. L. 1905, Ch. 4). However the Society governed by a Board received no state funding (S. L. 1905, Ch. 139).  Also the State Historical Society acquired Fort Abercrombie (Richland County) as an historic site.   Additionally all publishers of legal newspapers published statewide were required by law to send two copies to the State Historical Society. A campaign initiated by the North Dakota Federation of Women's Clubs requested that a monument of Sakakawea be placed on the North Dakota State Capitol grounds. The Society supported the campaign.

1906       The Collections of the State Historical Society was published by the Society.

1907       Legislation provided funds to the Society for its primary function of preserving books, manuscripts, photographs, and museum materials due to the “the rapid settlement of the state which rendered the procuring of historical data, relics, and topographical drawings”.  In particular data that related to the Indian Tribes and also of the early explorers of the upper Missouri River”.  Specifically the legislature required the Society to remove any relics of historical nature for preservation from the lands of Fort Clark and Mandan Village Sites as found on certain school lands in Mercer County (S. L. 1907, Ch. 131).  The duties of the Society as addressed in the 1905 legislation were amended (S. L. 1907, Ch. 130). This also included an appropriation for the work of the Society and a request of submitting a report to the Governor (S. L. 1907, Ch. 132).  Additionally the Legislative Assembly recognized ER Steinbrueck (curator of collections since 1904) and his “ability, integrity, and devotion of to the field and museum work”. The Assembly expressed “confidence” that the appropriation providing a salary to the field officer would be expended to the great benefit of this State and the Nation.  It was in partial recognition of the past valuable services of Steinbrueck that an appropriation was requested of the State Treasurer (S. L. 1907, Ch. 133).

1913       An act required an appropriation of money for maintenance, care, and repair of the Old Settlers and Historical Park in Walhalla (Pembina County) from “any money” in the North Dakota General Fund (S. L. 1913, Ch. 48) and also an appropriation for Whitestone Memorial Hill Park in Dickey County (S. L. 1913, Ch. 48). The Governor vetoed the bill relating to appropriations for the Society (S. L. 1913, Ch. 304) thereby repealing any legislation regarding the Society as it was passed in 1907 and 1909.

1915       Legislation appropriated funds for a curator, librarian, miscellaneous office work, and a field worker. (S. L. 1915, Ch. 23) and amended 1913 legislation concerning the powers and duties powers of the Society Board. Legislation also included funding for both historical sites and relics.  Land titles in certain counties that were vested in the State of North Dakota were placed in the custody of the Old Settlers Association in which the sites were located. The Associations were encouraged to improve the sites and use them for public park purposes.  The Associations could also accumulate and care for relics of historical interest however the relics contributed or purchased were by law in the custody of the State Historical Society.  Relics of a local historical nature could be loaned to a county Old Settlers Association when proper provision had been made for their care and preservation (S. L. 1915, Ch. 169).  This cooperation between the Society and the Old Settlers associations formed the nucleus of the state park system.  Additionally legislation required appropriations for the care, maintenance, and conservation of the state park at Fort Rice in Morton County (S. L. 1915, Ch. 46).

1917       The Society was authorized to “take charge of and care for and maintain” historical parks at Pembina (Pembina County) along with historic sites at Fort Abercrombie (Richland County), Walhalla (Pembina County), and Fort Rice in Morton County (S. L. 1917, Ch. 24).

1919       As part of the legislative appropriation the Society received funding to publish volume six of The Collections of the State Historical Society (S. L. 1919, Ch. 16).

1923       Funding was appropriated for the upkeep of ten state parks or for the purchase of additional parks (S. L. 1923, Ch. 98). This included the care and custody of the Whitestone Hill Battlefield in Dickey County (S. L. 1923, Ch. 345) with money appropriated for repairs (S. L. 1923, Ch. 128). The State Historical Society acquired the historic sites of Camp Atchison (Griggs County), Camp Corning (Barnes County), Camp Kimball (Foster County), Camp Weiser (Barnes County), McPhail’s Butte Overlook (Kidder County), and Chaska Historic Site (Burleigh County).  Also the Society was given authority to set up the War History Commission (S. L. 1923, Ch. 127).

1925       The State Historical Society moved from the State Capitol to the Liberty Memorial Building.  Legislation established the position of Superintendent first funded by the 1925 Legislative Assembly and Lewis J. Crawford was named acting superintendent.  Additionally volume seven of The Collections of the State Historical Society on the “Arikara Narrative” was completed.  Historic sites acquired by the State Historical Society were the David Thompson Memorial (McHenry County) and Camp Sheardown (Barnes County).  A House Concurrent Resolution concerning the Roosevelt National Park was sent to Congress (S. L. 1925, HCR unnumbered).

1926       The State Historical Society of North Dakota continued producing a historical publication under the title of North Dakota Historical Quarterly.

1927       The Society acquired the historic sites of Buffalo Creek (Cass County) and also Saint Claude in Rolette County.  Also legislation requested that the State Historical Society continue to publish quarterly reports (S. L. 1927, Ch. 164).

1930       Russell Reid who had worked as a museum assistant was named Superintendent.  On December 28 the old territorial Capitol was destroyed by fire.

1931       The site chosen to represent the longest unfortified international boundary of the world was the International Peace Garden Park (Rolette County) and was located between Manitoba in Canada and North Dakota in the United States. The development of the North Dakota portion was accomplished by the CCC camps sponsored by the State Historical Society in cooperation with the National Park Service. Additionally the State Historical Society acquired the historic sites of Fort Buford (Williams County), Fort Dilts (Bowman County), and Walhalla (Pembina County).

1932       Dedication of the International Peace Garden Park in Rolette County took place on July 14, 1932 and the State Historical Society acquired Huff Indian Village State Historic Site (Morton County).

1933       Historic sites acquired by the Society were Camp Arnold (Barnes County), the Oak Lawn Church (Pembina County), and also the Crowley Flint Quarry (Mercer County).

1934       The Society made application to the National Park Service requesting the services of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) park camps to develop North Dakota park areas. The State Historical Society acquired the Fort Mandan Overlook Historic Site (McLean County).

1935       The Board of the State Historical Society created the State Parks Committee.  Five members were selected with the approval of the Governor.  The members included George F. Will, Russell Reid, Robert Byrne, O.G. Libby, and Dana Wright. Legislation required that members be “a board of directors or other qualified persons who would perform duties vested in the State Historical Society” (S. L. 1935, Ch. 216).  The State Parks Committee sponsored the work of all CCC park camps in the state and many of the WPA park projects. Additionally the State Park Committee made a careful survey of all areas in the state which had been recommended for acquisition by the State.  Additionally the State Historical Society acquired the historic site of Molander Indian Village (Oliver County). The North Dakota's new Capitol building was completed.

1936       The State Historical Society acquired the historic sites of the Chateau de Mores (Billings County), Double Ditch Indian Village (Burleigh County), Fort Rice (Morton County),Writing Rock (Williams County), Palmer’s Spring (Benson County), and the first settlement and potential railroad town of Hudson established in 1883 (Dickey County). The site had a newspaper called The Hudson Herald.

1937       Separate appropriations were provided for the State Historical Society (S. L. 1937, Ch. 47) and also for State Parks and Camps (S. L. 1937, Ch. 49). The bill included Turtle River State Park (Grand Forks County), Chateau de Mores State Historic Site (Billings County), International Peace Garden Park (Rolette County), and building insurance to be paid by the State Insurance Department for Lake Metigoshe State Park in Bottineau County (S. L. 1937, Ch. 48).  Additional funding supported a museum at Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park in Morton County (S. L. 1923, Ch. 49).  The Society also acquired the Menoken Indian Village Historic Site (Burleigh County).

1938       Camp Grant Historic Site (Stutsman County) was acquired by the Society.

1939       The Legislative Assembly provided for the protection of archeological materials and sites.  It also required anyone investigating, exploring, or excavating sites to obtain a license or permit from the Superintendent of the State Historical Society.

1941       Funding from federal agencies including the National Park Service and the Works Progress Administration  (WPA) developed many state parks and historic sites and initiated various research and writing projects under the auspices of the State Historical Society of North Dakota.  Additional matching federal funds came from appropriations including Fort Ransom (Ransom County) and miscellaneous funding for reconstruction projects at Fort Union and Fort Buford both in Williams County (S. L. 1941, Ch. 49).  Also the Whitestone Hill Historic Site museum (Dickey County) constructed by the WPA was dedicated and the Society acquired the state historic site of the Steamboat Warehouse in Burleigh County.

1942       The State Historical Society acquired the Fort Ransom State Historic Site (Ransom County).

1943       Legislation provided the State Historical Society and State Parks Committee with funding to maintain and operate North Dakota parks and park camps including the International Peace Gardens Park (S. L. 1943, Ch. 65).

1945       The North Dakota Quarterly published by the State Historical Society was renamed North Dakota History.

1947       North Dakota Congressional Representative William Lemke re-introduced a bill [US House Resolution 731] authorizing the transfer of the Roosevelt Park to the National Park Service thereby creating the Theodore Roosevelt National Memorial Park (Billings and McKenzie County). It was passed by Congress and signed by President Harry S. Truman.

1949       Legislation required the involvement of the State Historical Society archaeology staff concerning the exploration for gas or oil on state land (S. L. 1949, Ch. 311).  Legislation also provided an apportionment for the Society to acquire, develop, and maintain Lake Metegoshe Recreational Park in Bottineau County (S. L. 1949, Ch.36) and were given authority to accept suitable location for the Roosevelt Cabin with the possibility of allowing the National Park Service to move the cabin (S. L. 1949, Ch. 37).  Legislation also included a land exchange [NDCC 54-01-13.1] related to the Theodore Roosevelt National Memorial Park (S. L. 1949, Ch. 310 and Ch. 326).  Two other bills on land exchanges took place between the State Historical Society and State Game and Fish Department (S. L. 1949, Ch. 403 and 429).

1951       The State Historical Society acquired as historic sites Camp Hancock (Burleigh County) and Camp Whitney (Kidder County).

1953       The Big Mound Battlefield (Kidder County) was acquired an historic site.

1954       The historic site called Sully’s Heart River Corral in Stark County was acquired by the Society.

1955       The Legislative Assembly requested the State Historical Society to explore avenues of cooperation in the management and maintenance of the Garrison Recreation Area by requesting the Army Corps of Engineers to provide for the development of recreational areas along the Garrison Dam Reservoir (S. L. 1955, SCR “C”). The Society acquired the historic sites of the Killdeer Mountain Battlefield (Dunn County) and Lake Jessie (Griggs County).

1956       The Gingras Trading Post (Pembina County) was acquired as an historic site by the Society and also the Maple Creek Crossing in Cass County.

1957       A part of the appropriations included funding for developing and maintaining historic sites and also for the purchase of microfilm equipment (S. L. 1957, Ch. 22).  Additionally legislation required the Society to seek federal aid for public access roads leading to the Lake Metigoshe Recreational Park (Bottineau County) and Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park in Morton County (S. L. 1957, Ch. 20) and it requested the exchange of federal land for state land (S. L. 1957, Ch. 346). Additionally the State Historical Society acquired the Wadeson Cabin Historic Site (Barnes County).

1959       The Society was authorized (S. L. 1959, Ch. 376) to establish and construct a state historical museum near or in the city of Pembina (Pembina County) and a subsection amended from the 1943 legislation determined how contributions for relics or sites approved for purchase by the Board of Directors of the Society would be paid (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372).  Legislation also concerned the problem of littering and depositing refuse upon recreational areas such as game refuges, lakes, rivers, and parks (S. L. 1959, Ch. 209). It created a National Statuary Commission that would determine a candidate whose statute could be placed in the National Statuary Hall at the United States Capitol in Washington DC (S. L. 1959, Ch. 366).  The State Historical Society acquired as historic sites the Cannonball Stage Station (Grant County) and the Brenner Crossing Historic Site (Eddy County).  A resolution requested that the State accept Fort Totten (Benson County) and authorized and directed the Society to accept it as an historic site from the federal government if offered (S. L. 1959, SCR J-J).  The Superintendent served as a member of the Yellowstone-Missouri-Fort Union Commission (S. L. 1959, Ch. 375).  In addition legislation created a position for a director of the State Parks Committee (S. L. 1959, Ch. 51) and required that a committee be appointed for the Medora (Billings County) Restoration project (S. L. 1959, HCR U).

1960       The State Historical Society acquired Fort Totten (Benson County) and also Medicine Rock in Grant County as historic sites.   Also in the 1960s federal records relating to Dakota Territory and North Dakota and were collected and assembled by the State Historical Society.  A constitutional amendment adopted on June 28, 1960 authorized the Legislative Assembly to separate agriculture and labor into two separate offices.

1961       Legislation provided appropriations for the Society (S. L. 1961, Ch. 11) and addressed the composition of the Board to include as ex-officio members the Governor, the State Auditor, the Secretary of State, the Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor, and the State Game and Fish Commissioner (S. L. 1961, Ch. 332). Legislation required the Society to build a museum at Pembina (Pembina County) and the Fort Totten Historic Site (Benson County) was also acquired at this time.  The Records Management Act was created to provide for efficient and economical management of records within the State [NDCC 54-46-08.1] with the Secretary of State serving as administrator (S. L.1961, Ch. 333).  Appropriations for the State Historical Society and State Parks were approved and listed in the apportionment were the historical sites and state parks including  1)International Peace Garden Park in Rolette County;  2)Pembina State Park in Pembina County; 3)Whitestone Hill State Park in Dickey County: 4)Fort Union and Fort Buford Historic Sites in Williams County; 5)Camp Hancock in Burleigh County; 6)Fort Abercrombie State Park in Richland County; 7)Garrison Reservoir State Park in McLean County; 8)Fort Totten Historic Site in Benson County; 9)Fort Seward State Park in Stutsman County; 10)Trail West outdoor historical drama amphitheater in Morton County; 11) Lake Metigoshe State Park in Bottineau County; and 12)Turtle River State Park in Grand Forks County (S. L. 1961, Ch. 6).  In a land exchange the Society was authorized to exchange certain land owned by the State with land deeds belonging to adjoining landowners in connection with Fort Union (Williams County). This action provided a more accessible and attractive entrance to the Historic Site (S. L. 1961, Ch. 338) and also for land at Walhalla in Pembina County (S. L. 1961, 339).  A House Resolution related to the retention and use by the Society of the Former Governors’ Mansion (Burleigh County) to become a historical museum (S. L. 1961, HR 8) and the State Historical Society acquired the historic site of Bismarck-to-Deadwood Stage Trail (Morton County).

1962       The Pembina Museum (Pembina County) was dedicated in observance of the 150th anniversary of the Selkirk Settlement.  The Society also acquired as an historic site Camp Buell (Sargeant County).

1963       The Board was restructured to include nine members with the appointments of members from the State Historical Society Foundation who were residents of the state and had been a Foundation member for the three previous years. The remaining nine members were appointed by the Governor (rather than elected by the membership) for staggered three-year terms. The officers of President, Vice-president, and Secretary were selected from its members and the Governor, the State Auditor, the Secretary of State, the Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor, and the State Game and Fish Commissioner served as ex-officio members (S. L. 1963, Ch. 368). The Superintendent was appointed as a member of the Theodore Roosevelt Rough Rider Awards Committee.  The Assembly also passed the North Dakota Heritage Study Commission (S. L. 1963, Ch. 369) and a recreation bond issue (S. L. 1963, Ch. 370). Additionally the Senate Concurrent Resolution asked for the Legislative Research Committee to study an outdoor recreation program (S. L.1963, SCR F-F).   The Legislature appropriated funds for the Pembina Museum in Pembina County (S. L. 1963, Ch. 66) and funding for dining facilities at the International Peace Garden Park in Rolette County (S. L. 1963, Ch. 70).  Legislation provided the Society with appropriations (S. L. 1963, Ch. 1) for the Yellowstone-Missouri-Fort Union Commission (S. L. 1963, Ch. 69) and transferred Fort Union (Williams County) to the National Park Service (S. L. 1963, Ch. 365).

1964       The Society acquired the first Sweden post office (established in 1879) as the Sweden State Historic Site (Walsh County).

1965       The State Historical Society became a state agency governed by the State Historical Board. Nine members served as a Board of Directors upon the approval of the North Dakota State Senate. Added to the ex-officio membership was the State Engineer, the State Highway Commissioner, the State Forester, State Game and Fish Commissioner, the Director of the State Library Commission, and the State Treasurer who replaced the State Auditor.  The Superintendent was appointed by the State Historical Board and served as chief administrative and executive officer to carry out the policies of the Board. The Legislative Assembly acted upon a 1960 amendment to the Constitution and separated the agriculture and labor departments into two distinct offices (S. L. 1965, Ch. 236).  Additional legislation included the creation of the North Dakota Parks Service (S. L. 1965, Ch. 379). State parks were removed from the administration of the State Historical Society and responsibility for the administration of all state parks, campgrounds, recreation areas, and reserves was given to the Park Service. Most historic sites continued to be under the supervision of the State Historical Society. The requirement of the North Dakota Heritage Commission to plan, design, promote, and finance a heritage center for the State Historical Society ended (S. L. 1965, Ch. 37, 379, & 381). Ray H. Mattison joined the Society from the National Park Service and was named Superintendent of the State Historical Society. At this time the Society acquired Fort Clark Historic Site in Mercer County.

1966       The State Historical Society acquired the Lake Johnson Historic Site in Griggs County. The Historic Preservation Act of 1966 was enacted [P.L. 89-665].

1967       The Legislative Assembly passed several bills relating to the State Historical Society including appropriations and the duties of the Superintendent (S. L. 1967, Ch. 411).  Legislation also addressed the protection of prehistoric sites by creating an act to provide for the preservation of pre-historic or historic sites, structures, and antiquities of State holding national significance (S. L. 1967, Ch. 412).  The Preservation of Historic Sites and Antiquities Act established the State Historic Sites Registry to define the terms state historic site, state historical marker, and state archeological site [NDCC 55-01-01].  The Superintendent of the State Historical Society had responsibility to notify the Legislative Assembly of recommendations or changes to a site designation and to complete updates to the registry (S. L. 1967, Ch. 415).  Legislation authorized the return of the historic sites of Fort Buford (Williams County), Fort Rice (Morton County), and Whitestone Hill Battlefield (Dickey County) from State Parks to the State Historical Society (S. L. 1967, Ch. 402).  The Commissioner of Agriculture no longer served as a member of the State Historical Board (S. L. 1967, Ch. 74).  The North Dakota Heritage Foundation, Inc. (a private, non-profit corporation) was organized in 1967 to serve as a support, advocacy, and fund raising organization for the State Historical Society of North Dakota.

1969       James E Sperry archaeologist with the State Historical Society was named Superintendent.  Legislation provided the appropriations for the State Historical Society (S. L. 1969, Ch. 4) and a separate appropriation for State Parks (S. L. 1969, Ch. 5).

1971       The Legislative Assembly recognized and accepted on behalf of the State of North Dakota the provisions of the federal Historic Preservation Act of 1966  and legislation also authorized and empowered the Society to carry out the purposes and objectives of the Act. The North Dakota State Archives was created (S. L. 1971, Ch. 512) requiring state agencies to check with the Society prior to disposing of agency records. Also the Secretary of State hired a records manager to aid in microfilming state agency records.  Other legislation abolished the State Parks Advisory Council (S. L. 1971, Ch. 527) and established the North Dakota American Revolution Bicentennial Commission (S. L. 1971, HCR 3018). 

1973       Legislation created the North Dakota American Revolution Bicentennial Commission (S. L. 1973, Ch. 440).

1975       Legislation appropriated funding for the building of the North Dakota Heritage Center.  Additionally a federal regulation of the National Historic Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) was enacted.  It required the establishing of a State Historical Records Advisory Board (SHRAB) and for the state of North Dakota become a national participant in a statewide records program.  Legislation transferred control of the former Governor’s Mansion [NDCC 55-02-08] to the State Historical Society of North Dakota (S. L. 1975, Ch. 494).

1976       Groundbreaking ceremonies for the North Dakota Heritage Center were held as part of the celebration of the American Revolution Bicentennial.  A selection of interviews collected and transcribed during the Oral History Project that included a substantial number of North Dakota residents was published in North Dakota History.

1977       The State Historical Board was charged with jurisdiction over the North Dakota Heritage Center building (S. L. 1977, Ch. 501) and legislation provided appropriations for the State Historical Society of North Dakota (S. L. 1977, Ch. 10).  The Legislative Assembly established the North Dakota State Archives confirming the Society’s authority to acquire state and local government records. The North Dakota State Archives became a division of the State Historical Society and legislation also provided for the hiring of the first state archivist (S. L. 1977, Ch. 502). The Superintendent served as a member of the Outdoor Recreation Interagency Council. Additionally legislation addressed the penalty for defacing a historical marker (S. L. 1977, Ch. 505).   Legislation also combined the North Dakota State Park Service with Outdoor Recreation creating a Parks and Recreation Department that included a Recreation Division and the Outdoor Recreation Interagency Council.  It was renamed the North Dakota Parks and Recreation Department (S. L. 1977, Ch. 503).

1979       Legislation addressed the role of the Heritage Commission upon completion of the Heritage Center. It required that the North Dakota Heritage Commission be repealed on July 1, 1981(S. L. 1979, Ch. 582).

1981       The North Dakota Heritage Center was completed and occupied by the State Historical Society. There were six divisions: Administration, Archaeology and Historic Preservation, Education and Interpretation, Historic Sites, Museum Division, and the Research and Reference Division that housed the North Dakota State Archives.  Recommendations by the Society to the Legislative Assembly included the need for a security officer and a volunteer coordinator. The office of the North Dakota Historical Foundation was located in the Heritage Center building and a Centennial Planning Committee was set up to plan for the 1989 celebration of statehood.

1983       Legislation updated the powers of the Board and removed the requirement of confirmation by the North Dakota State Senate after members had been appointed by the Governor.  Amendments were created and enacted relating to the duties of the Superintendent and the State Historical Board.  Included in legislation were the duties of the Superintendent as well as clearer definitions of how and why collections are acquired and the Society’s responsibilities for the care of historical collections. Terminology was broadened to define the word “collection” to represent an historical document or artifact (relic) and legislation also amended sections of the Code for handling and protecting of prehistoric or historic artifacts or historic sites (S. L. 1983, Ch. 582, Ch. 584, & Ch. 585). Additionally three new subsections were added to the Century Code regarding the acquisition of state historic sites and historic easements and the financing of sites for the purpose of restoration, reconstruction, and improvement of site buildings or structures (S. L. 1983, Ch. 589).  The Superintendent or a designee served as ex-officio member on the North Dakota Centennial Commission (S. L. 1983, Ch. 583).

1985       Legislation amended and reenacted a section of the Century Code relating archaeological, historical, and paleontological artifacts or sites either found or located on land owned by the State or a political subdivision of the State.  Procedures were established for “determining significance mitigating any actions that would affect an artifact or a site” (S. L. 1985, Ch. 590).   Language was added regarding demolition or alteration of any site listed in the State Historic Sites Registry and also the procedure for approval or mitigation of any proposed demolition or alteration of a state historic site (S. L. 1985, Ch. 595).   Additionally an emergency Historical Impact Fund for historical or archaeological projects was established (S. L. 1985, Ch. 591).  Legislation addressed the concern of the State Historical Board regarding the State Historic Sites Registry making additions to or deletions from the registry list (S. L. 1985, Ch. 594). The State Historical Board endorsed the benefit to the State of the federal historic preservation law (S. L. 1985, Ch. 596).   A project to gather naturalization records to be microfilmed and indexed from the fifty-three counties in the State began.  Also the North Dakota Heritage Center was awarded accreditation by the American Association of Museums.

1987       Changes were made to the powers and duties of the State Historical Board regarding membership and the consideration of charging an admission fee at historic sites was also addressed (S. L. 1987, Ch. 663).  Legislation added a new subsection to the Century Code [NDCC 55-10-08] regarding objections by political subdivisions relating to state historic site designations as determined by the State Historical Board (S. L. 1987, Ch. 667).   An extensive microfilming project of North Dakota newspapers was started with additional funding from the Bush Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the North Dakota Newspaper Association. The State Historical Society acquired the Stutsman County Courthouse (Stutsman County). Additionally the North Dakota Heritage Foundation became the successor to the Heritage Commission for the purpose of assisting with funding for Society projects.  

1989       Legislation related to disposal or transfer of a collections item (S. L. 1989, Ch. 682). The State Historical Society acquired the Pulver Mounds (McLean County).   Additionally North Dakotan’s celebrated 100 years of Statehood.

1990       Congress passed [P.L. 101-601, 25 USC 3001] the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA).

1991       Legislation allowed ex-officio Board members to appoint a designee who would have full voting privileges and there were name changes for the State Highway Commissioner who became the Director of the Department of Transportation, the State Commissioner became the Director of Game and Fish, and the State Librarian became the representative of the State Library all serving as Board members (S. L. 1991, Ch. 231; Ch. 638).  The Director of the Office of Management and Budget replaced the Director of Institutions (S. L. 1991, Ch. 592) and had responsibility for the Heritage Center building. Also the custody, control, and maintenance of the Former Executive Mansion (Burleigh County) became the responsibility of the State Historical Board (S. L. 1991, Ch. 592) and work began on the preserving the Stutsman County Courthouse (Stutsman County).  Legislation added “optical disk medium” to the methods of collection storage (S. L. 1991, Ch. 624) and allowed for the establishment and disposition of use fees (S. L. 1991, Ch. 639).  A legislative bill to merge the State Historical Society with Parks and Recreation and Tourism was defeated.  Additionally the Society entered into partnership with the North Dakota Geological Survey providing laboratory and storage space for the State Fossil Collection and office and work space for the State Paleontologist.

1992       The State Historical Society acquired the historic sites of the Pembina State Museum (Pembina County) and also the Turtle Effigy in Mercer County.

1995       The number of Board members appointed by the Governor was reduced to seven.  Removed as ex-officio members were the State Engineer, the State Forester, the State Librarian, and the Director of the Game and Fish Department. The Secretary of State, State Treasurer, and the Director of Transportation remained on the Board. New members were the Director of Parks and Recreation Department and the Director of the Tourism Department (S. L. 1995, Ch. 537). Legislation addressed the acceptability of charging admission fees for certain exhibits (S. L. 1995, Ch. 538). Other legislation concerned the location of the State Historical Museum at Pembina (Pembina County) and retaining the Camp Hancock Site (Burleigh County) but not as a Historic House Museum (S. L. 1995, Ch. 539). The Legislature allowed funding for the Society to purchase offsite storage to house collections.

1997       The Pembina State Museum (Pembina County) the Society’s first regional museum opened.

1998       Samuel J. Wegner was appointed Superintendent and the North Dakota Heritage Center was reaccredited by the American Association of Museums. Additionally the North Dakota Heritage Foundation changed its name to the State Historical Society of North Dakota Foundation.  

1999       The Legislative Assembly approved appropriations to improve historic sites that were active during the Lewis and Clark era.  Legislation amended and reenacted a section of the Century Code concerning the authority of the State Historical Board.  Legislation also acted on prohibiting the alteration or demolition of an historic site (S. L. 1999, Ch. 486).  A Senate Concurrent Resolution was sent to Congress concerning the admission to the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol in Washington DC of a replica of the statute of Sakakawea (S. L. 1999, Ch. 642).     

2000       Merlan E Paaverud became Interim Superintendent of the State Historical Society and Lewis and Clark projects began in preparation for the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Commemoration. 

2001       The State Historical Society became an executive branch agency under the supervision and control of the State Historical Board and Merlan E Paaverud was appointed Director of the State Historical Society of North Dakota. The position of Superintendent was renamed the Director and jurisdiction over the North Dakota Heritage Center transferred from the State Historical Board to the State Historical Society of North Dakota.  Board membership increased from seven to twelve by changing the Secretary of State, the Director of Parks and Recreation Department, the Director of the Department of Transportation, the Director of the Tourism Department, and the State Treasurer or their designees from ex-officio status to full voting privileges.  The remaining seven members of the Board appointed by the Governor had to be US citizens and state residents. They served three-year terms. Additionally the Century Code was amended with two new sections relating to the duties and responsibilities of the State Historical Board and the State Historical Society.  The Roosevelt Cabin as a property was transferred from the State Historical Society Board to the North Dakota Park Service.  Another change included deleting the word Memorial from the Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Also changed was the Yellowstone-Missouri-Fort Union Commission to  become the Yellowstone-Missouri Rivers Confluence Commission (S. L. 2001, Ch. 503).  Legislation created the Department of Commerce and the Tourism Department became the Division of Tourism within the Department of Commerce (S. L. 2001, Ch. 488).  The fundraising campaign was launched for replicating the statute of Sakakawea to be sent to the National Statuary Hall.  The 20th anniversary of the North Dakota Heritage Center was celebrated.   Governor John Hoeven appointed members to the State Historical Society of North Dakota Commission to study expansion needs of the Society.  In addition several major projects for the Society included the Missouri-Yellowstone Confluence Interpretive Center (Williams County) and activities involving the Lewis and Clark celebration.  The Society sponsored a gathering of snow angels on the mall in front of the State Capitol and established a record for the number of participants. This was recorded in the Guinness World Records.

2003       Legislation added a new section to the Century Code relating to the protection of historical sites, to the powers of the State Historical Board, and the consideration for a study by the Legislative Council regarding the protection of historical or archaeological artifacts or sites (S. L. 2003, Ch. 511).  The Yellowstone-Missouri Confluence Interpretive Center (Williams County) was completed. There was an amendment to legislation concerning the Yellowstone-Missouri-Fort Union Commission [NDCC 55-06-01].   The 58th Legislative Assembly granted the Society authority to add movable storage units to the Heritage Center collection areas and expand interpretive centers at the historic sites of Fort Abercrombie (Richland County) and Chateau de Mores in Billings County (S. L. 2003, Ch. 510).  Restoration of the Former Governors’ Mansion carriage house (Burleigh County) was completed.  Legislation also provided statewide funding for the Society to act as the administrator for the Cultural Heritage Grant program by providing appropriated grant funding to local museums and local historical societies.   The replica statue of Sakakawea was dedicated in Washington DC.                

2004       The reconstructed barracks at Fort Buford State Historic Site (Williams County) was completed.

2005       Authority was given to the State Historical Society for the identification, development, and administration of the state historical marker program (S. L. 2005, Ch. 541). The Legislative Assembly approved funding for an interpretive center at the Chateau de Mores State Historic Site (Billings County) and financing for the addition of the North Dakota State Archives section to the Heritage Center (S. L. 2005, Ch. 51). 

2006       Legislation allowed for control by the Society of the Oscar Zero Launch Control Center (Griggs County) near Cooperstown as the 56th historic site and the North Dakota Corridor of Time was launched by the Geological Survey and State Historical Society.  

2007       In a ceremony at the Heritage Center ownership of Sitting Bull’s burial site (Sioux County) owned and managed by the Society since 1956 was transferred to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. The Commissioner of Commerce replaced the Director of Tourism as a member of the State Historical Society Board (S. L. 2007, Ch. 493). The North Dakota State Archives addition was completed.   Reclaiming the snow angle title was successful and again took place on the Capitol grounds. The State Historical Society acquired the historic site of Oscar Zero. It was later renamed the Ronald Regan Minuteman Missile Historic Site (Griggs County).

2008       New interpretive centers were opened at the Chateau de Mores State Historic Site (Billings County) and Fort Abercrombie State Historic Site (Richland County).  In partnership with the North Dakota Center for Distance Education the Society published a high school and college-level North Dakota Studies book.  A key transfer ceremony between the US Air Force and the Society regarding the Oscar Zero Launch Control Center (Griggs County) was held.  The Society created a traveling exhibit as part of the Traveling Interpretive Exhibit Service (TIES) program and statewide events celebrating the Bicentennial of President Abraham Lincoln were held.

2009       The 61st Legislative Assembly approved funding for construction that would expand the North Dakota Heritage Center and along with the state appropriation the State Historical Society of North Dakota Foundation accepted responsibility for providing extra moneys to complete the renovation and exhibits (S. L. 2009, Ch. 28). The Ronald Reagan Minuteman Missile State Historic Site (Oscar Zero Launch Control Center in Griggs County) opened.  Additionally a fire badly damaged and destroyed the WPA structure and exhibits at Whitestone Hill Battlefield State Historic Site (Dickey County).  The American Association of Museums approved the reaccreditation for the North Dakota Heritage Center and the State Historical Society of North Dakota became the host agency for North Dakota History Day.  

2011       New public exhibits completed the remodeling project for the interpretive center at Fort Totten State Historic Site (Benson County).  The North Dakota Studies program became a part of the State Historical Society. Legislation was passed exempting certain collections of libraries, archives, or museums from the North Dakota open records requirement (S. L. 2011, Ch. 333).  Also legislation authorized the State Historical Society to provide the public with an historically accurate written description of the requirements and the official design of the State Flag. Whenever a state entity or political subdivision purchased or replaced a North Dakota state flag the established requirements were to be followed (S. L. 2011, Ch. 384).

2012       Projects of restoration began at the Stutsman County Courthouse (Stutsman County) and at the hospital site at Fort Totten (Benson County).  Construction continued the Heritage Center.

2013       A new subsection was added to the Code [NDCC 55-08-01.3] relating to the historic, prehistoric, archaeological, and paleontological preservation at a designated historic site and in a state park (S. L. 2013, Ch. 438). Funding for purchase and repair of the Lawrence Welk farmstead site (Emmons County) was appropriated by the Legislative Assembly (S. L. 2013, Ch. 18).    

2014       North Dakota celebrated 125 years of statehood with the grand opening of the North Dakota Heritage Center. The celebration included a statehood exhibit and the opening of two galleries. Claudia J. Berg became the first woman to be appointed Director of the State Historical Society of North Dakota.

2015       Legislation repealed from the Code [NDCC 55-06] the Historical Study of the Yellowstone and Missouri River Confluence Commission (S. L. 2015, Ch. 431) and amended the Code [NDCC 55-01-02] with a plan formulated for the Yellowstone Missouri Rivers Confluence Projects. Additionally funding was provided for the purchase and repair of the Lawrence Welk farmstead in Emmons County (S. L. 2015, Ch. 49) and appropriations were given for repair at the Whitestone Hill Native Memorial (Dickey County) and Double Ditch Indian Village Historic Site (S. L. 2015, Ch. 52).

Sources:
Davis, Jim and Sarah Walker. (2015). Recording North Dakota’s Past. North Dakota Blue Book (pp. 1-40). Bismarck. North Dakota Secretary of State.
Gray, David P. Guide to North Dakota State Archives, 1983.
Laws of Dakota Territory.
North Dakota Century Code.
North Dakota Secretary of State Blue Book.
North Dakota State Legislature Session Laws.
Reid, Russell. “The North Dakota State Park System.” North Dakota History 8.1:63-78. Print.
State Historical Society of North Dakota Website.

Record Series
30203 Superintendent's Correspondence
30204 Historic Sites and State Park Monthly Reports
30205 Curator's Correspondence
30206 Board of Directors' Correspondence
30207 Administrative Memoranda
30209 Correspondence re: WPA Projects Sponsored by the State Historical Society
30211 Budget Files
30212 Audit Reports
30213 Secretary's Files
30214 International Peace Garden Files
30215 Natural Resource Council Files
30216 State Outdoor Recreation Agency Council Files
30217 Fort Abraham Lincoln Files
30218 Custer-Fort Abraham Lincoln Foundation Reports
30237 State Parks. Fort Abercrombie Records
30238 State Parks. Civilian Conservation Corps Camps - Fargo Metropolitan State Park
30239 State Parks. Civilian Conservation Corps Camps - Bismarck Metropolitan Parks
30240 State Parks, Civilian Conservation Corps Camps - South Roosevelt Regional State Park
30241 State Parks. Civilian Conservation Corps Camps - International Peace Garden State Park
30253 State Parks. North Roosevelt and Fort Abraham Lincoln Parks Albums
30254 State Parks. State Park Construction Projects
30258 State Parks. Theodore Roosevelt State Park
30529 Historical Data Project. Pioneer Biographies
30548 Historical Data Project. Local Histories
30549 Historical Data Project. Transcripts of Local Government Records
30550 North Dakota Writers' Project. County History Files
30551 North Dakota Writers' Project. City History Files
30552 North Dakota Writers' Project. North Dakota Guide Files
30553 North Dakota Writers' Project. Place Name Survey Data
30554 North Dakota Writers' Project. Place Name Survey Forms
30555 North Dakota Writers' Project. Old Post Office and Ghost Towns Files
30556 North Dakota Writers' Project. Geographical Place Names Files
30557 North Dakota Writers' Project. Points of Interest Files
30558 North Dakota Writers' Project. Hard Wheat Study Files
30559 North Dakota Writers' Project. Ethnic Group Files
30560 North Dakota Writers' Project. History of Grazing Files
30561 North Dakota Writers' Project. "America Eats" Files
30562 North Dakota Writers' Project. Folklore Files
30563 North Dakota Writers' Project. State Director's Correspondence
30564 North Dakota Writers' Project. Personnel Files
30565 North Dakota Writers' Project. General Correspondence
30566 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. State Survey Files
30567 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. Manuscript Survey Files
30568 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. Local Government Records Survey
30569 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. Transcripts of County Commission Proceedings
30570 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. Naturalization Index
30573 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. Map and Photo Survey Files
30574 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. Church Survey Files
30575 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. Church Index
30576 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. Civilian Defense Survey
30577 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. Social and Fraternal Organization Index
30578 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. Newspaper Survey
30579 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. North Dakota Imprints
30580 North Dakota Historical Records Survey. Photographs
30785 State Archives. Biographies and Portraits of Prominent Citizens of the State
30786 State Archives. Record of Pioneers on or Before 1889
31481 Administration. Historic Site Deeds
31532 State Archives. Division Files
32140 Historic Sites. Maps, Blueprints, Specifications
32141 Education and Interpretation, Events Photography
32142 Historic Preservation. Planner Files
32178 Historic Sites. Audiovisual Materials
32179 Education and Interpretation, Events and Programs
32286 Historic Sites, Fort Totten Photographs
32294 Museum Division Curator Files, Norman Paulson
32314 Historic Sites. Missile Site Oral Histories
32329 State Archives. Interviews with Governor Edward Schafer
32333 Archaeology and Historic Preservation, Audiovisual Material
32334 Museum Division. Exhibits Production Files
32352 Historic Sites, Interpretive Signs
32353 Museum Division, Audiovisual Materials
32354 Communication & Education, News Releases
32357 Communications & Education, County and Local Historical Society Files
32358 Administration, Posters

Address:
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phone: 701.328.2666
email: histsoc@nd.gov