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HUMAN SERVICES
[Authorized: NDCC Chapter 50-06]

State-supported public or social welfare services in North Dakota have had a long and varied history. Care for the poor and handicapped was the responsibility of local governments for many years. In 1869 the Territorial Legislature authorized Boards of County Commissioners to serve "as overseers of the poor" in their respective counties. The Boards of County Commissioners were allowed to raise funds for payment of allowances to the poor and to parents with mentally or physically handicapped children, and to establish a county poor house (T. L. 1869, Ch. 17). A 1907 law authorized Boards of County Commissioners to appoint a Board of Visitors to inspect county asylums and poor farms and report to the Board of County Commissioners concerning treatment and care of residents (S. L. 1907, Ch. 64). The duties of "overseers of the poor" were transferred from the Board of County Commissioners to township supervisors in 1913 (S. L. 1913, Ch. 121). In 1915, the State Legislature authorized payment of "mother's pensions" to needy women with dependent children under14 years of age (S. L. 1915, Ch. 185). Initially, the pensions amounted to $15 a month for each child and were paid by the County Treasurer. In 1933, Boards of County Commissioners were again given responsibility for administration of poor relief (S. L. 1933, Ch. 97).

Direct state involvement in social welfare began with the creation of the Public Welfare Commission in 1917 (S. L. 1917, 181). The Public Welfare Commission was composed of the Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor, Attorney General, and a woman (at least thirty years of age) experienced in welfare work with women and girls. The female member was appointed by the Governor and served as executive officer of the Commission. The Public Welfare Commission was required to study wages, hours, and working conditions affecting women and child workers in the state and to make recommendations to the Governor for legislation to eliminate abuses. The duties of the Public Welfare Commission were limited to the investigation of the economic, moral, and social conditions of women and child workers in factories, hotels, restaurants, stores, and laundries. The Commission had the authority to order the State Hotel Inspector to investigate conditions affecting women and child workers in hotels and restaurants. The executive officer of the Commission also had the same police powers as the State Humane Society. The Public Welfare Commission was repealed with creation of the Workmen's Compensation Bureau in 1919.
               
In 1921 the Board of Administration was authorized to accept federal funds provided by H.R. 4438, "An Act to Provide for the Promotion of Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons disabled in Industry...and Their Return to Civil Employment." Working through the Director of Vocational Education, the Board of Administration channeled funds into the rehabilitation of disabled workers through special schools and classes. The Board of Administration also had responsibility for developing statewide vocational plans and conducting investigations or studies concerning the rehabilitation of the disabled (S. L. 1921, Ch. 115). The State Legislature created a Children's Code Commission in 1921 consisting of one representative appointed by the Governor for a two-year term from each of the following organizations: the State Conference of Social Work, State Federation of Women’s Clubs, North Dakota Medical Association, North Dakota Bar Association, North Dakota State Federation of Labor, and the State Minimum Wage Department. The Children's Code Commission was required to study social conditions affecting the welfare of children in the state, recommend necessary revisions in existing state laws to advance the interests of children, and report their findings to the State Legislature.

In the next legislative session (1923), the powers of the Board of Administration expanded to include responsibility for regulation of children’s homes and other institutions that cared for children (S. L. 1923, Ch. 161 and 162). The Board of Administration had the authority to license children’s homes and child placement agencies, investigate adoption homes, review petitions for adoption, act as guardian for neglected, delinquent, and handicapped children, administer the "mothers' pension" law, enforce child labor laws and laws relating to sex offenses and other illegal activities involving children, enforce the compulsory education law, assist juvenile courts, and serve as probation officers. The child welfare duties of the Board of Administration were repealed in 1961 (S. L. 1961, Ch. 337).

In response to the degenerative impact of the Great Depression on the economy and people of North Dakota, the State Legislature passed emergency legislation in 1933 creating the State Board of Public Welfare. Consisting of the Governor, Attorney General, Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor, and seven members appointed by the Governor for six-year terms, the State Board of Public Welfare was authorized to accept federal funds for relief to the destitute, old age assistance, mothers' aid, aid to dependent children, maternal and child health, care of handicapped children, aid to County Welfare Boards, and the study of poverty, unemployment, and other social problems.

Legislation in 1935 authorized counties to create County Welfare Boards consisting of five, seven, or nine members appointed by the Board of County Commissioners for three year terms. The County Welfare Boards were required to administer aid to the poor and accepted funds from the State Board of Public Welfare for support of relief and welfare services. Through creation of the State Board of Public Welfare and the County Welfare Board network, the state was able to respond to many of the needs of North Dakotans and lay the framework for state-coordinated and state-funded public welfare services.

The volume and demand for social welfare services continued to grow during and after the Depression and World War II years. The State Legislature appropriated additional funds in 1937 to be distributed to County Welfare Boards for relief activities, loans to farmers for livestock feed, and more aid to children, the aged, and the blind. The Old Age Assistance Act, passing in 1937 (S. L. 1937, Ch. 211), provided financial assistance to the needy elderly. In the same year, the State Board for Public Welfare was authorized to extend financial aid to the needy blind (S. L. 1937, Ch. 210) and allowed to accept federal funds for provision of aid to dependent children and the needy, aged, and blind (S. L. 1937, Ch. 86).

Legislation in 1939 required the regulation of children’s homes and the regulation of retirement homes in 1945. Another service was an enhanced program of state-wide vocational education (1947).  A Crippled Children’s Commission was created in 1941 (S. L. 1941, Ch. 242) consisting of three members appointed by the Governor for staggered three-year terms. The Crippled Children’s Commission was required to work with the State Board of Public Welfare to promote the interests of handicapped children and to plan, study, and facilitate the provision of medical and social services to handicapped children. The State Board for Public Welfare assumed the duties of the Crippled Children’s Commission in 1971.
               
Other services, such as an enhanced program of state-wide vocational education (1947), aid to the disabled (1951), workshops and programs for employment of the handicapped (1967), establishment of a State Youth Advisory Board to supervise juvenile delinquents (1969), and establishment of eight regional human service centers in the late 1960s and 1970s greatly increased the impact of the State Board for Public Welfare on North Dakotans.

In 1971 the name of the agency was changed to the Social Service Board of North Dakota. Consolidation of a number of state agencies and another name change in 1981 resulted in what is known as the Department of Human Services. The Department was created in 1981 (S. L. 1981, Ch. 486) and consists of a number of state agencies and divisions merged for administrative purposes. Agencies included or incorporated by the Department of Human Services were the Social Service Board and the regional human service centers, the Governor's Council on Human Resources, the Division of Mental Health and Retardation, the State Hospital, the Division of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, and the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The Department of Human Services is headed by an executive director appointed by the Governor and has provided services in a broad range of areas to eligible individuals and families. The agency administers social and rehabilitation programs in community services, vocational rehabilitation, medical services, and economic assistance. Specific functions include research and treatment of mental illness and other developmental disabilities, a vocational rehabilitation program, research on and prevention of alcohol and drug abuse, assistance payments to the economically disadvantaged.  Also included are the advocacy and protection of the interests of the handicapped, children, and the aged.

The Department was to be structured to promote efficient and effective operations consistent with fulfilling its prescribed statutory duties, and to act as the official agency of the state responsible to discharge functions not otherwise served by another state agency.  Such as the administration of programs for children and families, administration of program for persons with developmental disabilities, programs for aging services (as funded under the Older Americans Act of 1965), administration of mental health programs, the crippled children programs, administration of alcohol and drug abuse programs, administration of economic assistance programs, and administration of medical services programs. Additionally, the executive director of the Department was required to maintain a close liaison with county social service agencies (S. L. 1987, Ch. 570).   

In the late 1980s the Department was required to serve as the official agency for administration of federal social and rehabilitation programs in the areas of community services, vocational rehabilitation, medical services, and economic assistance and administer the specific programs for the children and youth such as child protection, foster care and adoption.  Also the programs for the State Youth Authority, developmentally disabled persons, persons with mental or emotional disorders, crippled children and persons affected by alcohol and drug abuse. Other programs were for senior citizens through its aging services division, persons eligible for economic assistance such as AFDC, food stamps, and the medically needy persons.  In addition to the administrative duties and responsibilities the department structure included the State Hospital, the Governor's Council on Human Resources, the eight regional human service centers, and the vocational rehabilitation division. On July 1, 1989, the Department added the Grafton State School.

In 1991 legislation related to advocating for families by the use of political, economic, social, and judicial measures for the purpose of supporting the unity and stability of the family through programs concentrating the concerns of women, children, and families (S. L. 1991, Ch. 509). Additional changes were made to the duties and structure of the Department. The executive director was to consult and maintain a close working relationship with the State Department of Health and Consolidated Laboratories, the Superintendents of the School for the Deaf and School for the Blind, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (S. L. 1991, Ch. 592).  Legislation related to human services committees including the State Council on Developmental Disabilities to be maintained by the Department of Human Services instead of residing in the Office of the Governor. 

In 1995 a name change for the committee on children and youth to children and family services which became a division of the Department of Human Services [NDCC 50-27-03] and changes to the authority of the division were addressed (S. L. 1995, Ch. 458). Also the Legislature appointed an executive director and eliminated the Human Services Advisory Board (S. L. 1995, Ch. 457). Legislation concerned changes for the Developmental Center at Grafton including name, administration, and control (S. L. 1995, Ch. 34).

In 2005 legislation related to confidentiality of information contained in Department records. A penalty for this violation was provided for in the Century Code (S. L. 2005, Ch. 408). Also legislation was requested by the Department concerning the placement of children needing the “least restrictive care”, extending the moratorium on expansion of residential treatment center for children bed capacity, and moratorium on expansion of residential child care facility or group home bed capacity (S. L. 2005, Ch. 409). Along with legislation concerning the confidentiality of records, laws addressed checks on criminal history for day care providers. Also addressed were abortion, autism, dementia, and gambling bills.  Youth at risk programs and support for county programs were covered and the Legislature contracted with a statewide charitable food recovery and distribution organization (S. L. 2009, Ch. 416).

CHRONOLOGY

1869       Authorization of Boards of County Commissioners and Township Boards of Supervisors to serve as “overseers of the poor”. This included establishing county poorhouses or county asylums. A Board of Visitors was appointed annually to investigate the conditions in the asylums (T. L. 1869, Ch. 17). The law was repealed in 1963 (S. L. 1963, Ch. 107).

1890       The Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor was given an appropriation of $2,500 for relief of the “needy sufferers in the destitute districts” (S. L. 1890, Ch. 17).

1913       Supervisors of several townships became overseers (S. L. 1913, Ch. 121).

1915       An act regulating maternity hospitals, boarding of children, and the business of placing children. The District Court Judge licensed such institutions and businesses (S. L. 1915, Ch. 183 and Ch.185).

1917       The Public Welfare Commission was created in 1917 and remained in place until 1919. The Commission consisted of the Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor, the Attorney General, and a “woman experienced in welfare work among women and girls”. She was appointed by the Governor and served as executive officer of the Commission.  The duty of the Commission was to investigate the economic, moral, and social condition of women, girls, and child workers and report to the Governor and make recommendation to the State Legislature (S. L. 1917, Ch. 181).

1921       The Children’s Code Commission was established and was required to study social conditions affecting the welfare of children in the state, recommend necessary revisions in existing state laws to advance the interests of children, and report their findings to the State Legislature. It served until 1923. Also, the US Congress approved House Resolution 4438 on June 2, 1920 promoting vocational rehabilitation.  The Board of Administration worked with the Director of Vocational Education who administered the funds, formulated plans, and otherwise facilitated the promotion of vocational rehabilitation (S. L. 1921, Ch. 115).

1923       The Board of Administration duties expanded giving the Board further responsibilities in regard to child welfare such as acting as juvenile delinquent probation officers, or parole officers, investigating adoption homes, receiving and providing a place for feeble-minded persons, caring for illegitimate, defective, crippled, or neglected children. An executive officer and agents could be employed. The Board had responsibility until 1961 for child welfare in the state (S. L 1923, Ch.150). Other duties of the Board included licensing homes and institutions that care for children. The Board licensed persons and corporations that place children in family homes (S. L. 1923, Ch. 161 and Ch. 162).

1933       The Board of County Commissioners was given ultimate jurisdiction over the administration of poor relief (S. L. 1933, Ch. 97).

1935       Creation of the State Board of Public Welfare with the Governor, Attorney General, and the Commissioner of Agriculture and Labor who appointed a seven-member State Board of Public Welfare “to study social problems and assist County Boards in every way”. The membership included a veteran of the First World War. Terms of membership were staggered six-year terms.  An executive director was appointed and the Board was the official agency of the state for any social welfare activity initiated by the federal government such as: relief of destitute or necessitous persons, mother’s aid, old age assistance, aid to dependent children, maternal and child health, care of crippled children, aid to child welfare service, and public health service (S. L. 1935, Ch. 221). Creation of County Welfare Boards became a requirement by the Board of County Commissioners. Between five and nine members could be selected and the Board of County Commissioners was to administer relief financed through the Public Welfare Board of North Dakota (S. L. 1935, Ch. 123).

1937       The State Public Welfare Board was to administer the “Aid to the Needy Blind Act” (S. L. 1937, Ch. 210). The Old Age Assistance Act, passing in 1937 (S. L. 1937, Ch. 211), provided financial assistance to the needy elderly. The Board was allowed to accept federal funds for provision of aid to dependent children, and the needy, aged, and blind (S. L. 1937, Ch. 86).

1941       Crippled Children’s Commission served until 1971. A Commission was created consisting of three members appointed by the Governor. Terms were staggered at three-years and the Commission was to work with the Public Welfare Board to provide medical and social services (S. L. 1941, Ch. 242).

1945       The Public Welfare Board was to license boarding homes for the aged and infirm (S. L. 1945, Ch. 280).

1947       The State Board of Vocational Rehabilitation (which was the Board of Higher Education) was to contain a division of rehabilitation and appoint a director for the division (S.L. 1947, Ch. 170).

1949       The executive director of the State Public Welfare Board served as a member of the North Dakota Indian Affairs Commission.

1951       The Public Welfare Board administered aid to the permanently and totally disabled (S. L. 1951, Ch. 290).

1955       The State Board of Public School Education (which was the State Board of Vocational Education) established a division of vocational rehabilitation. The Board acted through the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and the act was administered through an appointed director (S. L. 1955, Ch. 132).

1959       Legislation appropriated money known as the State Public Welfare Fund to be kept by the State Treasurer and available for necessary provisions (S. L. 1959, Ch. 372).

1961       The child welfare duties of the Board of Administration were repealed in 1961 (S. L. 1961, Ch. 337).

1963       Legislation concerned the powers and duties of the Public Welfare Board (S. L. 1963, Ch. 326) and an act to provide for a combined program to assist the aged, blind, disabled, and medical assistance for the aged. It was administered by the Public Welfare Board (S. L. 1963, Ch. 328) and legislation amended the financing of welfare programs (S. L. 1965, Ch. 181).

1967       An act to provide for the establishment and operation of sheltered workshops for the purpose of providing remunerative employment for the severely handicapped. The division of vocational rehabilitation appointed an eleven-member Sheltered Workshop Advisory Committee (S. L. 1967, Ch. 222).

1969       An act provided for a State Youth Authority [NDCC 27-21] to be administered by the Public Welfare Board.  It was to take custody of delinquent and unruly children committed to its care by juvenile courts.  A State Youth Authority Advisory Board consisted of a juvenile judge, the Superintendent of the State Hospital, and the Superintendent of the State Industrial School was to evaluate and recommend placement, custody, and rehabilitation programs for committed children (S.  L. 1969, Ch. 290). The executive director of the State Public Welfare Board served as a member of the State Board of Examiners for Nursing Home Administrators.
 
1971       The name of the Public Welfare Board was changed to the Social Service Board of North Dakota (S. L. 1971, Ch. 465). Also the Board expanded to seven members who were appointed by the Governor to serve four-year terms. In addition to the division of community services and the division of economic assistance other programs such as psychological testing and marital counseling were added (S. L. 1971, Ch. 466). Legislation removed the Superintendent of Public Instruction from the administration of the division of vocational rehabilitation (S. L. 1971, Ch. 158). The welfare department coordinated the service in the social service centers and the services provided by the mental health centers which were under the direction of the State Health Department (S. L. 1971, Ch. 11).

1973       An act required the establishment of human service centers [NDCC 54-40-09] to provide human services in areas such as mental health, aging, food and nutrition, and economic self-sufficiency from one single unit. There were three human service centers and five area social service centers that provided consultation services to Job Service, the courts, schools, clergy, physicians, and other professionals dealing with social problems (S. L. 1973, Ch. 428). Also the responsibility for the state division for vocational rehabilitation [NDCC 50-06.1] to the Social Service Board of North Dakota was enacted (S. L. 1973, Ch. 383). Terms were lengthened to six years for members of the Social Service Board (S. L. 1973, Ch. 382).

1975       A new act related to the administration and financing of the food stamp program in the state and the powers and duties of the County Welfare Boards and the Social Service Board of North Dakota (S. L. 1975, Ch. 440).

1979       Legislation required collocation of mental health services (under the direction of the State Health Department) and the social service units (directed by the Social Service Board of North Dakota) for the purpose of improving the quality and efficiency in delivery of service within each of the eight regions of the state.  Additionally to provide for joint intake, interagency referral, and inter-program planning and coordination, to encourage regional collocation of other related human services. Also to provide for fiscal incentive for collocation of county social services in the regional centers and provide for the Social Service Board of North Dakota to reimburse qualifying service units and human service centers (S. L. 1979, Ch. 338).  

1981       Legislation concerned the creation of a Department of Human Services for the state and amended and reenacted sections of the Century Code such as a name change, the qualifications and responsibilities of the executive director and the staff of the centers, divisions, and institutions within the newly created department. Changes were made to the Developmental Disabilities Council (S. L. 1981, Ch. 486). Other legislation related to the powers and duties of the County Social Service Boards and the Social Service Board as created and enacted in the 1979 supplement of the Century Code. Also included was the administration of the energy assistance program (S. L. 1981, Ch. 484).

1983       The Legislative Assembly appropriated funding for the Department programs such as continuing the psychiatric residency program and implementing a comprehensive community residential program for developmentally disabled children by using intermediate care facilities and other such foster home and group home resources when appropriate. It was the intent of the Legislature to reimburse the Department for special education boarding care and placement of congregate care was made in facilities designated by the Department (S. L. 1983, Ch. 62). Additionally legislation amended the Century Code [NDCC 50-06-05.3] to set up a Human Service Council that would consist of no more than thirteen members. The Council was to be appointed by Boards of County Commissioners of the respective counties within a region meeting jointly with the director of the regional human service center. Terms of appointment and qualifications of members were listed (S. L. 1983, Ch. 313).

1985       Legislation amended and reenacted sections to the Century Code [NDCC 14-13-03] relating to the divisions within the office of human services and the office of economic assistance and county administration of the Department of Human Services.  The Department structure [NDCC 50-06-01.4] included the State Hospital and within the administration of the Department were the Developmental Disabilities Division, Mental Health Division, and Alcohol and Drug Abuse Division. New was the Children and Family Services Division (replacing social services division including aging services unit, and crippled children’s services). Also new was a public economic assistance division within the enforcement unit in the office of economic assistance and county administration. Another new division was the division of vocational rehabilitation including regional vocational rehabilitation offices (S.L. 1985, Ch. 521).  Legislation required the Department or County Social Service Boards to provide information to foster care providers (S. L. 1985, Ch. 528). New language was added to the foster care licensure legislation (S. L. 1985, Ch. 529).
               
1987       An amendment to the Century Code [50-06-05.2] concerned regional human service centers and responsibility of licensure and collocation with County Social Service Boards (S. L. 1987, Ch. 73) be delivered through regional human service centers located in the areas designated by the Governor [1978-12  executive order]. This legislation replaced an earlier order by the Governor.  Additional legislation concerned a new subsection added to the Century Code relating to special needs adoptions, foster care children, and rulemaking authority and another subsection related to aid to dependent children and foster care children (S. L. 1987, Ch. 571). Additionally, the executive director of the Department was required to maintain a close liaison with county social service agencies (S. L. 1987, Ch. 570).

1989       New legislation related to the Human Services Advisory Board and membership. Nine members from across the state were appointed by the Governor and the responsibilities and rulemaking authority were listed (S. L. 1989, Ch. 575). A statute created the Commission on the Status of Women within the Governor’s Council on Human Resources (S. L. 1989, Ch. 333).

1991       Legislation related to human services committees including the State Council on Developmental Disabilities to be maintained by the Department of Human Services instead of residing in the Office of the Governor.  Eliminated from the Board was the representative from the Director of Institutions (S. L. 1991, Ch. 508). Other changes included the establishment of a Children’s Trust Fund created in the State Treasury which was administered by the Committee on Children and Youth with clerical support provided by the Department of Human Services (S. L. 1991, Ch. 508). The Commission on the Status of Women was moved with other committees with related interests within human services to the Department of Human Services. Members were still appointed by the Governor (S. L. 1991, Ch. 508).

1993       Legislation changed the Century Code [50-06-05.1] with an amendment that added a new subsection to child and foster care services (S.L. 1993, Ch. 472), and the Legislature allowed a lease or transfer use of any part of developmental center facilities or properties with the approval of the Governor (S. L. 1993, Ch. 2). Legislation also related to the lease of space for the purpose of providing child care services and the requirements to be met (S. L. 1993, Ch. 473).

1995       Legislation placed the Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities [NDCC 50-06-01]  and a director [NDCC 54-44.3-20] within the Department of Human Services and removed from the Century Code [NDCC 50-26] the Governor’s Council on Human Resources established in 1965 (S.L. 1965, Ch. 328). Also, the Committee on Aging [NDCC50-06-05.6] became a part of the administrative structure of the Department of Human Services (S. L. 1995, Ch. 458). Additionally the general assistance contract of the Department regarding contracts and agreement language was changed including contracts with the US Government or an appropriate agency (S. L. 1995, Ch. 456). 
               
1997       Legislation was concerned with HIV insurance payments (S. L. 1997, Ch. 405), exemption from premium tax for premium or capitated fees paid by the Department (S. L. 1997, Ch. 407). A new Century Code section [NDCC 14-09-10] enumerated requirements modifying existing child support orders ( S. L. 1997, Ch. 404) and payment of expenditures to counties and recommendations made by the county commissions (S. L. 1997, Ch. 403). The Legislature created and enacted a new section to Century Code [50-06-05.1] concerning the powers of the Department and for registration of sexually violent predators (S. L. 1997, Ch. 136).

2001       Legislation related to treatment for children with serious emotional disorders (S. L. 2001, Ch. 419) and updated the law on the human services premium tax exemption (S. L. 2001, Ch. 420). Additional legislation concerning treatment providers for services related to the awareness and intervention and rehabilitation for compulsive gambling (S. L. 2001, Ch. 421) and also a new section to the Century Code on compulsive gambling detailing the responsibilities of the Department in relation to those in need of treatment (S. L. 2001, Ch. 460).         

2003       An act on behalf of the counties seeking an agreement for the Department to provide supervision for the designation of regional human service center programs and supervision in cases of multicounty program administration (S.L. 2003, Ch. 408). Additional legislation related to the provision of treatment services for children with serious emotional disorders (S.L. 2003, Ch. 409).

2005       Another request was for appropriation of a unified system for guardianship services for adults with developmental disabilities who are ineligible for case management services (S. L. 2005, Ch. 410). Other legislation concerned the biennial report and programs administered or funded by the Department (S. L. 2005, Ch. 411) and an appropriation lasting for one biennium that would establish an “alternatives-to-abortion” service program (S. L. 2005, Ch. 412).

2007       Legislation concerned programs such as criminal history record checks on childhood services providers, licensing, and registration of early childhood services providers (S. L. 2007, Ch. 422).

2009       An act to amend and reenact a section of the Century code relating to confidentiality of records concerning information contained on the master client index data matching systems (S. L. 2009, Ch. 411). An amendment was made to the “alternative-to-abortion” legislation adopted during an earlier legislative session (S. L. 2009, Ch. 412). Legislation created an autism spectrum disorder task force and amended legislation concerning residential care for children with autism spectrum disorder (S. L. 2009, Ch. 413) a service care program for individuals with  dementia (S. L. 2009, Ch. 414) and legislation concerning a program for services to transition-aged youth at risk including the definition and rules (S. L. 2009, Ch. 415). Also legislation passed along the program to contract with a statewide charitable food recovery and distribution organization (S. L. 2009, Ch. 416) and also required legislation review of developmental disability providers (S. L. 2009, Ch. 417).

SERIES

31004 Committee on Children and Youth Files.
31005 General Subject Files.
31006 Committee on Children and Youth Subject Files.
31007 Commission on the Status of Women Subject Files.
31008 Resource File on Women.
31009 Handicapped Employer of the Year Files.
31010 Essay Contest Files.
31011 General Ledger.
31012 Photographs.31209 Administration. Program Evaluation.
31232 Aging Services Division. Older Americans Act Grant Files.
31311 Mental Health Division. Executive Director’s Files. CONFIDENTIAL
31312 Vocational Rehabilitation Division. North Dakota Advisory Committee on Vocational Rehabilitation Files.
31313 Vocational Rehabilitation Division. Vocational Rehabilitation Services Planning Files.
31314 Vocational Rehabilitation Division. Vocational Rehabilitation Services Reports and Evaluations.
31384 State Council on Developmental Disabilities. Minutes
31389 Crippled Children’s Services. Crippled Children’s Service State Plans.
31506 Administration. Social Service Board Minutes. CONFIDENTIAL. 
31507 State Council on Developmental Disabilities Files.
31508 State Council on Developmental Disabilities Grant Files.
31509 Committee Appointment Files.
31594 Board of Public Welfare. Indian Files.        
31727 Personnel Division. Past Employee Data Binders.
31834 State Council on Developmental Disabilities Files.
31837 Vocational Rehabilitation Division. Scrapbooks.
31858 Grafton (ND) State School. Building Reports.
31889 Mental Health Division. Grant Files.
31890 Chronically Mentally Ill. Assessment Files.
32004 Executive Office Legal. ARC Files.
32005 Children’s Special Health Division. State Plans.
32006 General Medical Services Division. Records.
32053 Committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities Records.
32072 Fuel Assistance. State Plans.
32103 Volunteer Services. Records of the Executive Director.
32211 Human Service Centers. Records.

SOURCES

Gray, David P.  Guide to the North Dakota State Archives, 1985.
Laws of Dakota Territory.
Legislative History of North Dakota State Agencies: Richard J. Wolfert State Librarian. State Library Commission, 1978.
North Dakota Department of Human Services Website.
North Dakota Century Code.
North Dakota Secretary of State Blue Book.
North Dakota State Legislature Session Laws.

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